<img height="1" width="1" alt="" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=339969342818956&ev=NoScript" />
88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Today's stream is sponsored by Maxie's

Sylvan Esso at Pabst Theater

September 5, 2014 - 19:00
Click to enlarge

Due to overwhelming demand Sylvan Esso has been moved to the historic Pabst Theater. All tickets purchased for the Cactus Club will be honored. Don’t sleep on this one. Like a jigsaw puzzle of disparate genres fitting together in strange and lovely ways Sylvan Esso will move your body and spirit.

Sylvan Esso was not meant to be a band.  Rather, Amelia Meath had written a song called “Play It Right” and sung it with her trio Mountain Man.  She’d met Nick Sanborn, an electronic producer working under the name Made of Oak, in passing on a shared bill in a small club somewhere.  She asked him to scramble it, to render her work his way.  He did the obligatory remix, but he sensed that there was something more important here than a one-time handoff: Of all the songs Sanborn had ever recast, this was the first time he felt he’d added to the raw material without subtracting from it, as though, across the unseen wires of online file exchange, he’d found his new collaborator without even looking.

Meath felt it, too.  Schedules aligned.  Moves were made.  And as 2012 slipped into 2013, Sanborn and Meath reconvened in the unlikely artistic hub of Durham, N.C., a former manufacturing town with cheap rent and good food.  Sylvan Esso became a band.  A year later, their self-titled debut—a collection of vivid addictions concerning suffering and love, darkness and deliverance—arrives as a necessary pop balm, an album stuffed with songs that don’t suffer the longstanding complications of that term.

These 10 tunes were realized and recorded in Sanborn’s Durham bedroom during the last year, an impressive feat considering the layers of activity and effects that populate them—the dizzyingly crisscrossed harmonies of “Play it Right,” the gorgeously incongruous elements of “Wolf,” the surreptitiously minimalist momentum of “HSKT.”  Sanborn’s production is fully modern and wonderfully active.  He enlists obliterating dubstep stutters and crisp electropop pulses, hazy electrostatic breezes and epinephrine dancefloor turnarounds.