Summerfest – Jade Bird

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JADE BIRD

For Jade Bird, the second that lockdown lifted, there were no aimless summer days spent meeting friends in parks; no languorous evenings in pub gardens. She was headed straight back to Nashville to complete her second album — albeit via a strict two-week quarantine in Mexico City. She allowed herself to see no more of the Mexican capital than the local store and a leg-stretching walk around the block, not wanting to jeopardise any chance of being allowed into the States to finish what she had started with Grammy-winning producer Dave Cobb (Brandi Carlile, John Prine, Lady Gaga). The highlight of her stay in Mexico was literally her boyfriend pointing out a particularly gnarly spider he spotted as he had a cigarette on the balcony. “I move on really quick,” Jade explains of the urgency she felt. “My partner always says there’s no in between with me whatsoever, it’s on or it’s off. My feeling was: I’m in it, I love these songs, I want to sing. That’s why we made heaven and earth move so I could do that in that moment.”

For Jade, moving fast was about staying connected to the music that she had written (as always), not capitalising on momentum or anyone else’s idea of a career plan. She had a taste of the UK hype cycle, making the BBC’s 2018 Sound Of… poll and being tipped everywhere from Vogue to Rolling Stone. Her self-titled debut album arrived a year later. Despite those early garlands, she didn’t become an overnight success. “I was really glad,” she says. “Musically I was not ready. Lyrically I was not ready. And mentally I was not ready.” Nevertheless, Jade Bird — as barnstorming an album as came out in 2019 — received plaudits from the likes of Pitchfork and NPR. And it showed Jade, an obsessive at bettering her craft, how she wanted to build on the foundations she had laid. She was grateful that her label, Glassnote, was invested in letting her develop album by album. “If you lose a sense of who you are, to re-establish that is really difficult,” she says of the pressures hype puts on developing artists. “And the time that it takes for you to re-evaluate your life, your sound, who you are, the UK doesn’t have time for that either.”

That mature perspective is typical of Jade, who even at 21 was wise to how young female musicians are expected to become cute ambassadors for feminism. (“I’m not sure how to do anything but what I’m doing because what I’m doing is feminism,” she told the Guardian. “You don’t need to wear a hashtag T-shirt.”) Still, as all 21-year-olds tend to, she thought she had life pegged. A standout from her debut, Love Has All Been Done Before, looked at her mum and her grandma’s respective divorces and confidently concluded that any relationship of hers would also end up doomed. She proved herself wrong: she’s been with her boyfriend (he’s also her guitarist) for three years. “I ended up realising I’m really happy and stable,” she says.

Her new song, Houdini, puts to bed the part of her past where she was obsessed with literal abandonment. If her debut reflected on “literally every male family member being absent, present, absent, present,” she says, Different Kinds of Light reflects on what it means to stay, to love, to allow yourself to be loved. It’s about “being with somebody who you adore more than the whole world that hasn’t got the foundations to believe in themselves,” she says. “Hasn’t had people supporting them in a way that their potential can be realised, ’cause they’ve been crippled by the people or environments that surround them.”

Jade translated these conflicted emotional states into sharply observed narrative vignettes that show her flair as a storyteller: the guy oblivious to what’s in front of him, the escape artist who confesses to being “asleep at the wheel my whole damn life”; the wastrel burning through their promise. “If I had a penny for all your potential, I’d be left drowning in my mouthful of metal,” Jade sings on Now Is the Time. It speaks to how quickly her writing has matured from the more polemical storytelling of her debut. “When you’re young, you sit in a chaos of emotions and desperately try to write out of it,” says Jade, who’s still only 23. “But when you’re older, you work out what’s affected you and why more clearly. It’s amazing what two years can do: it’s like you’re writing as you’re watching instead of writing to see.”

Different Kinds of Light was properly born in a rental in upstate New York in January. (When Jade finished her day’s writing in the shed and walked back to the house, there were often bear tracks in the snow.) Some came from the song-a-day project that she undertook during lockdown, which she spent with her boyfriend, her mum and grandma at home near Gatwick. In Mexico, she pushed herself to write more and found her British influences — the Smiths, Cocteau Twins — coming out. She used to road-test songs live; not being able to do so this year brought out a different side of her writing. One new highlight, I’m Getting Lost, “is quite a bizarre riff to jam out,” says Jade, “so it helped me evolve at the same time.”

After a session together earlier in the year that minted their studio chemistry, Jade returned to Nashville with more new material to bring to life with Dave Cobb, though she maintained an equally monastic lifestyle, moving strictly between her apartment and the studio to protect herself and her collaborators. She and Dave had clicked in an earlier session thanks to how he treated her potent yet weathered vocals. “I love anyone who can make you sound so imperfect in a great way,” she says. They let her sound find its groove, joining tough 90s alt-rock and the melodicism of Blur and Oasis at their sweetest to the taut rattle of Iggy Pop’s The Passenger. “That rock element that I’ve been missing and deeply love,” is how Jade describes it. “If I’m in the car, that’s what I put on.”

There’s also the spirit of Fleetwood Mac’s pop epics. Stevie Nicks’ Storms inspired Different Kinds of Light’s title track, written last summer while Jade toured the US with Jason Isbell and Father John Misty. “It says so much: ‘did not deal with the road,’ ‘I have always been a storm.’ There’s so much in that record that breaks my whole being,” she says, melting. She had experienced her own hard times on tour. Anxiety would come and go: a side-effect of being hyper-productive, as she’s observed in many young women. “The problem with me is that if you push me, I tend to do well,” she says. “The line where I’ve had enough is hard to find. I think so many artists are crippled by guilt, ’cause you know that opportunities aren’t handed out every day so you end up trying to do them all. It’s toxic, but it comes with the nature of the industry.”

Last summer, that blind work ethic resulted in Jade sometimes becoming physically unable to perform and having to cancel shows. It felt devastating at first. “After that tour, we went to Cornwall and I remember sitting on a rock and listening to Storms over and over and over again, crying and crying and crying, and it being really cathartic,” she says. It wasn’t that the skies cleared and suddenly everything was fine. “What frustrates me is that if you have a mental illness, it gets marketed like it’s going to go away,” says Jade. “I think it’s counterproductive to a lot of families who are dealing with people with mental health illnesses, like depression — you know you’re going to love that person that way for life, you love them with it, and you’ll never love them without it. That’s who you are and that’s why you love them.”

In the US, Jade became part of a community of songwriters and career artists who showed her that a happier, more holistic and sustainable way of working was possible. The likes of Isbell, Sheryl Crow and Jade’s friend and champion, Brandi Carlile, promote a nurturing environment, she says, and often tour with their families in tow. It was inspiring. “Especially for a young, female artist, knowing that you can be happy and do your job is really underrated,” says Jade. (Also inspiring: for a truly life-affirming vision, look up footage on YouTube of Jade, Brandi and Sheryl performing 9 to 5 with Dolly Parton, Linda Perry, Maggie Rogers, Natalie Hemby, Maren Morris, Amanda Shires and more at last year’s Newport Folk Festival, a vision in jewel-coloured pant suits.) Jade resents the modern idea that musicians are also expected to be marketers and businesspeople; for her, musicians are meant to be artists. She admires Brandi’s longevity: “It took her six albums before she hit By the Way, I Forgive You. The work ethic! The belief!”

Hence why Jade and her partner are moving to the US — flying out on the date of the 2020 election, no less. Plus she’s young and she’s never lived away from home before, bar the many months spent on the tour bus: why not? They’re starting in Austin, moving in with a photographer friend, but Jade calls it “the move before the move” — next they might go to Nashville, or Portland. Jade isn’t releasing Different Kinds of Light until autumn 2021, in the hope that touring is possible again by then. (You’ve never heard anyone sound as unconvinced as Jade talking about how it’s been to perform virtually.) “I want the album to have a moment,” she says.

In the meantime, maybe she’ll work on the punk album she’s been making with iconic songwriter Linda Perry, a concept record inspired by the B-52s, the Raincoats and riot grrrl, and based on feminist author Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s utopian 1915 novel, Herland, about a society composed entirely of women who can reproduce asexually. “It’s in my back pocket,” says Jade, brimming with excitement. “Third album, fourth album.” There’s no rush. The trepidation she felt about her profession on her debut has dissipated. “I never felt like I could call myself an artist — like, we’ll see. Whereas I know that’s my occupation now. That’s who I am, and that’s incredibly reassuring.”

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Women dominate the 2021 Grammys, with big wins for Billie Eilish, Beyoncé and Megan Thee Stallion

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Beyoncé won four Grammy Awards to become the most celebrated performer in the awards show’s history during an unpredictable ceremony that mixed the arrival of major new artists with repeat victories by Grammy favorites and surprisingly intimate performances with more familiar staged bombast.

The two biggest awards of the night went to Billie Eilish’s “Everything I Wanted,” which won record of the year and Taylor Swift’s quarantine-produced folklore, which picked up the album of the year prize. After coming up empty in her first five nominations Sunday, Swift had to wait for most of the ceremony before taking home her third career Grammy in that category, becoming just the fourth artist to do so.

Upon receiving the Recording Academy’s most prestigious award, Eilish, who swept the major categories in last year’s awards, immediately deflected credit and said Houston rapper Megan Thee Stallion should have won the award for her song “Savage.”

Getty Images for The Recording A Beyoncé and Megan Thee Stallion accept the Best Rap Performance award for ‘Savage’ onstage during the 63rd Annual GRAMMY Awards at Los Angeles Convention Center on March 14, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images for The Recording Academy)

Megan Thee Stallion, one of the music industry’s most notable new arrivals in 2020, still took home three awards: best new artist, best rap song and best rap performance. Her “Savage” remix featuring Beyoncé helped the latter pass Alison Krauss for most Grammys ever by a female artist and tie super-producer Quincy Jones at 28 career trophies. Only classical conductor Georg Solti (31) has won more Grammy hardware.

The complete list of nominees and winners of the 63rd annual Grammy Awards, presented on March 14, 2021, is below.

1. Record Of The Year

  • “Black Parade” by Beyoncé
  • “Colors” by Black Pumas
  • “ROCKSTAR” by DaBaby feat. Roddy Ricch
  • “Say So” by Doja Cat
  • Winner: “Everything I Wanted” by Billie Eilish
  • “Don’t Start Now” by Dua Lipa
  • “Circles” by Post Malone
  • “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion feat. Beyoncé

2. Album Of The Year

  • Chilombo by Jhené Aiko
  • Black Pumas (Deluxe Edition) by Black Pumas
  • Everyday Life by Coldplay
  • Djesse Vol. 3 by Jacob Collier
  • Women In Music Pt. III by HAIM
  • Future Nostalgia by Dua Lipa
  • Hollywood’s Bleeding by Post Malone
  • Winner: Folklore by Taylor Swift

3. Song Of The Year

  • “Black Parade” by Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters (Beyoncé)
  • “The Box” by Larrance Dopson, Samuel Gloade, Rodrick Moore, Adarius Moragne, Eric Sloan & Khirye Anthony Tyler, songwriters (Roddy Ricch)
  • “Cardigan” by Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)
  • “Circles” by Louis Bell, Adam Feeney, Kaan Gunesberk, Austin Post & Billy Walsh, songwriters (Post Malone)
  • “Don’t Start Now” by Caroline Ailin, Ian Kirkpatrick, Dua Lipa & Emily Warren, songwriters (Dua Lipa)
  • “Everything I Wanted” by Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)
  • Winner: “I Can’t Breathe” by Dernst Emile II, H.E.R. & Tiara Thomas, songwriters (H.E.R.)
  • “If The World Was Ending” by Julia Michaels & JP Saxe, songwriters (JP Saxe feat. Julia Michaels)

4. Best New Artist

  • Ingrid Andress
  • Phoebe Bridgers
  • Chika
  • Noah Cyrus
  • D Smoke
  • Doja Cat
  • Kaytranada
  • Winner: Megan Thee Stallion

Pop

5. Best Pop Solo Performance

  • “Yummy” by Justin Bieber
  • “Say So” by Doja Cat
  • “Everything I Wanted” by Billie Eilish
  • “Don’t Start Now” by Dua Lipa
  • Winner: “Watermelon Sugar” by Harry Styles
  • “Cardigan” by Taylor Swift

6. Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

  • “Un Dia (One Day)” by J Balvin, Dua Lipa, Bad Bunny & Tainy
  • “Intentions” by Justin Bieber feat. Quavo
  • “Dynamite” by BTS
  • Winner: “Rain On Me” by Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande
  • “Exile” by Taylor Swift feat. Bon Iver

7. Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

  • Blue Umbrella by (Burt Bacharach &) Daniel Tashian
  • True Love: A Celebration of Cole Porter by Harry Connick, Jr.
  • Winner: American Standard by James Taylor
  • Unfollow The Rules by Rufus Wainwright
  • Judy by Renée Zellweger

8. Best Pop Vocal Album

  • Changes by Justin Bieber
  • Chromatica by Lady Gaga
  • Winner: Future Nostalgia by Dua Lipa
  • Fine Line by Harry Styles
  • Folklore by Taylor Swift

Dance/Electronic Music

9. Best Dance Recording

  • “On My Mind” by Diplo & SIDEPIECE
  • “My High” by Disclosure feat. Aminé & Slowthai
  • “The Difference” by Flume feat. Toro y Moi
  • “Both of Us” by Jayda G
  • Winner: “10%” by  Kaytranada feat. Kali Uchis

10. Best Dance/Electronic Album

  • Kick I by Arca
  • Planet’s Mad by Baauer
  • Energy by Disclosure
  • Winner: Bubba by Kaytranada
  • Good Faith by Madeon

Contemporary Instrumental Music

11. Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

  • Axiom by Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah
  • Chronology of a Dream: Live at the Village Vanguard by Jon Batiste
  • Take the Stairs by Black Violin
  • Americana by Grégoire Maret, Romain Collin & Bill Frisell
  • Winner: Live at the Royal Albert Hall by Snarky Puppy

Rock

12. Best Rock Performance

  • Winner: “Shameika” by Fiona Apple
  • “Not” by Big Thief
  • “Kyoto” by Phoebe Bridgers
  • “The Steps” by HAIM
  • “Stay High” by Brittany Howard
  • “Daylight” by Grace Potter

13. Best Metal Performance

  • Winner: “Bum-Rush” by Body Count
  • “Underneath” by Code Orange
  • “The In-Between” by In This Moment
  • “BLOODMONEY” by Poppy
  • “Executioner’s Tax (Swing of the Axe)” – Live by Power Trip

14. Best Rock Song

  • “Kyoto” by Phoebe Bridgers, Morgan Nagler & Marshall Vore, songwriters (Phoebe Bridgers)
  • “Lost In Yesterday” by Kevin Parker, songwriter (Tame Impala)
  • “Not” by Adrianne Lenker, songwriter (Big Thief)
  • “Shameika” by Fiona Apple, songwriter (Fiona Apple)
  • Winner: “Stay High” Brittany Howard, songwriter (Brittany Howard)

15. Best Rock Album

  • A Hero’s Death by Fontaines D.C.
  • Kiwanuka by Michael Kiwanuka
  • Daylight by Grace Potter
  • Sound & Fury by Sturgill Simpson
  • Winner: The New Abnormal by The Strokes

Alternative

16. Best Alternative Music Album

  • Winner: Fetch the Bolt Cutters by Fiona Apple
  • Hyperspace by Beck
  • Punisher by Phoebe Bridgers
  • Jaime by Brittany Howard
  • The Slow Rush by Tame Impala

R&B

17. Best R&B Performance

  • “Lightning & Thunder” by Jhené Aiko feat. John Legend
  • Winner: “Black Parade” by Beyoncé
  • “All I Need” by Jacob Collier feat. Mahalia & Ty Dolla $ign
  • “Goat Head” by Brittany Howard
  • “See Me” by Emily King

18. Best Traditional R&B Performance

  • “Sit On Down” by The Baylor Project feat. Jean Baylor & Marcus Baylor
  • “Wonder What She Thinks of Me” by Chloe X Halle
  • “Let Me Go” by Mykal Kilgore
  • Winner: “Anything For You” by Ledisi
  • “Distance” by Yebba

19. Best R&B Song

  • Winner: “Better Than I Imagined” by Robert Glasper, Meshell Ndegeocello & Gabriella Wilson, songwriters (Robert Glasper feat. H.E.R. & Meshell Ndegeocello)
  • “Black Parade” by Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters (Beyoncé)
  • “Collide” by Sam Barsh, Stacey Barthe, Sonyae Elise, Olu Fann, Akil King, Josh Lopez, Kaveh Rastegar & Benedetto Rotondi, songwriters (Tiana Major9 & EARTHGANG)
  • “Do It” by Chloe Bailey, Halle Bailey, Anton Kuhl, Victoria Monét, Scott Storch & Vincent Van Den Ende, songwriters (Chloe X Halle)
  • “Slow Down” by Nasri Atweh, Badriia Bourelly, Skip Marley, Ryan Williamson & Gabriella Wilson, songwriters (Skip Marley & H.E.R.)

20. Best Progressive R&B Album

  • Chilombo by Jhené Aiko
  • Ungodly Hour by Chloe X Halle
  • Free Nationals by Free Nationals
  • F*** Yo Feelings by Robert Glasper
  • Winner: It Is What It Is by Thundercat

21. Best R&B Album

  • HAPPY 2 BE HERE by Ant Clemons
  • Take Time by Giveon
  • To Feel Love/d by Luke James
  • Winner: Bigger Love by John Legend
  • All Rise by Gregory Porter

Rap

22. Best Rap Performance

  • “Deep Reverence” by Big Sean feat. Nipsey Hussle
  • “BOP” by DaBaby
  • “WHATS POPPIN” by Jack Harlow
  • “The Bigger Picture” by Lil Baby
  • Winner: “Savage” by Megan Thee Stallion feat. Beyoncé
  • “Dior” by Pop Smoke

23. Best Melodic Rap Performance

  • “ROCKSTAR” by DaBaby feat. Roddy Ricch
  • “Laugh Now Cry Later” by Drake feat. Lil Durk
  • Winner: “Lockdown” by Anderson .Paak
  • “The Box” by Roddy Ricch
  • “HIGHEST IN THE ROOM” by Travis Scott

24. Best Rap Song

  • “The Bigger Picture” by Dominique Jones, Noah Pettigrew & Rai’shaun Williams, songwriters (Lil Baby)
  • “The Box” by Larrance Dopson, Samuel Gloade, Rodrick Moore, Adarius Moragne, Eric Sloan & Khirye Anthony Tyler, songwriters (Roddy Ricch)
  • “Laugh Now Cry Later” by Durk Banks, Rogét Chahayed, Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Ron LaTour & Ryan Martinez, songwriters (Drake Featuring Lil Durk)
  • “ROCKSTAR” by Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, Ross Joseph Portaro IV & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch)
  • Winner: “Savage” by Beyoncé, Shawn Carter, Brittany Hazzard, Derrick Milano, Terius Nash, Megan Pete, Bobby Session Jr., Jordan Kyle Lanier Thorpe & Anthony White, songwriters (Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé)

25. Best Rap Album

  • Black Habits by D Smoke
  • Alfredo by Freddie Gibbs & The Alchemist
  • A Written Testimony by Jay Electronica
  • Winner: King’s Disease by Nas
  • The Allegory by Royce 5’9″

Country

26. Best Country Solo Performance

  • “Stick That In Your Country Song” by Eric Church 
  • “Who You Thought I Was” by Brandy Clark
  • Winner: “When My Amy Prays” by Vince Gill
  • “Black Like Me” by Mickey Guyton
  • “Bluebird” by Miranda Lambert

27. Best Country Duo/Group Performance

  • “All Night” by Brothers Osborne
  • Winner: “10,000 Hours” by Dan + Shay & Justin Bieber
  • “Ocean” by Lady A
  • “Sugar Coat” by Little Big Town
  • “Some People Do” by Old Dominion

28. Best Country Song

  • “Bluebird” by Luke Dick, Natalie Hemby & Miranda Lambert, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)
  • “The Bones” by Maren Morris, Jimmy Robbins & Laura Veltz, songwriters (Maren Morris)
  • Winner: “Crowded Table” by Brandi Carlile, Natalie Hemby & Lori McKenna, songwriters (The Highwomen)
  • “More Hearts Than Mine” by Ingrid Andress, Sam Ellis & Derrick Southerland, songwriters (Ingrid Andress)
  • “Some People Do” by Jesse Frasure, Shane McAnally, Matthew Ramsey & Thomas Rhett, songwriters (Old Dominion)

29. Best Country Album

  • Lady Like by Ingrid Andress
  • Your Life Is A Record by Brandy Clark
  • Winner: Wildcard by Miranda Lambert
  • Nightfall by Little Big Town
  • Never Will by Ashley McBryde

New Age

30. Best New Age Album

  • Songs from the Bardo by Laurie Anderson, Tenzin Choegyal & Jesse Paris Smith
  • Periphery by Priya Darshini
  • Form//Less by Superposition
  • Winner: More Guitar Stories by Jim “Kimo” West
  • Meditations by Cory Wong & Jon Batiste

Jazz

31. Best Improvised Jazz Solo

  • “Guinnevere” by Christian Scott aTunde Adjuah, soloist 
  • “Pachamama” by Regina Carter, soloist
  • “Celia” by Gerald Clayton, soloist
  • Winner: “All Blues” by Chick Corea, soloist
  • “Moe Honk” by Joshua Redman, soloist

32. Best Jazz Vocal Album

  • Ona by Thana Alexa
  • Winner: Secrets are the Best Stories by Kurt Elling feat. Danilo Pérez
  • Modern Ancestors by Carmen Lundy
  • Holy Room: Live At Alte Oper by Somi With Frankfurt Radio Big Band, Conducted By John Beasley
  • What’s the Hurry by Kenny Washington

33. Best Jazz Instrumental Album

  • On the Tender Spot of Every Calloused Moment by Ambrose Akinmusire
  • Waiting Game by Terri Lyne Carrington + Social Science
  • Happening: Live at the Village Vanguard by Gerald Clayton
  • Winner: Trilogy 2 by Chick Corea, Christian McBride & Brian Blade
  • Roundagain by Redman Mehldau McBride Blade

34. Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

  • Dialogues on Race by Gregg August
  • Monk’estra Plays John Beasley by John Beasley’s MONK’estra
  • The Intangible Between by Orrin Evans And The Captain Black Big Band
  • Songs You Like A Lot by John Hollenbeck With Theo Bleckmann, Kate McGarry, Gary Versace And The Frankfurt Radio Big Band
  • Winner: Data Lords by Maria Schneider Orchestra

35. Best Latin Jazz Album

  • Tradiciones by Afro-Peruvian Jazz Orchestra
  • Winner: Four Questions by Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra
  • City of Dreams by Chico Pinheiro
  • Viento y Tiempo – Live at Blue Note Tokyo by Gonzalo Rubalcaba & Aymée Nuviola
  • Trane’s Delight by Poncho Sanchez

Gospel/Contemporary Christian Music

36. Best Gospel Performance/Song

  • “Wonderful Is Your Name” by Melvin Crispell III
  • “Release (Live)” by Ricky Dillard Featuring Tiff Joy; David Frazier, songwriter
  • “Come Together” by Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins Present: The Good News; Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins & Jazz Nixon, producers; Lashawn Daniels, Rodney Jerkins, Lecrae Moore & Jazz Nixon, songwriters
  • “Won’t Let Go” by Travis Greene; Travis Greene, songwriter
  • Winner: “Movin’ On” by Jonathan McReynolds & Mali Music; Darryl L. Howell, Jonathan Caleb McReynolds, Kortney Jamaal Pollard & Terrell Demetrius Wilson, songwriters

37. Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song

  • “The Blessing (Live)” by Kari Jobe, Cody Carnes & Elevation Worship; Chris Brown, Cody Carnes, Kari Jobe Carnes & Steven Furtick, songwriters
  • “Sunday Morning” by Lecrae Featuring Kirk Franklin; Denisia Andrews, Jones Terrence Antonio, Saint Bodhi, Rafael X. Brown, Brittany Coney, Kirk Franklin, Lasanna Harris, Shama Joseph, Stuart Lowery, Lecrae 
  • “Holy Water” by We The Kingdom; Andrew Bergthold, Ed Cash, Franni Cash, Martin Cash & Scott Cash, songwriters
  • “Famous For (I Believe)” by Tauren Wells Featuring Jenn Johnson; Chuck Butler, Krissy Nordhoff, Jordan Sapp, Alexis Slifer & Tauren Wells, songwriters
  • Winner: “There Was Jesus” by Zach Williams & Dolly Parton; Casey Beathard, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

38. Best Gospel Album

  • 2econd Wind: Ready by Anthony Brown & group therAPy
  • My Tribute by Myron Butler
  • Choirmaster by Ricky Dillard
  • Winner: Gospel According to PJ by PJ Morton
  • Kierra by Kierra Sheard

39. Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

  • Run to the Father by Cody Carnes
  • All of My Best Friends by Hillsong Young & Free
  • Holy Water by We The Kingdom
  • Citizen of Heaven by Tauren Wells
  • Winner: Jesus Is King by Kanye West

40. Best Roots Gospel Album

  • Beautiful Day by Mark Bishop
  • 20/20 by The Crabb Family
  • What Christmas Really Means by The Erwins
  • Winner: Celebrating Fisk! (The 150th Anniversary Album) by Fisk Jubilee Singers
  • Something Beautiful by Ernie Haase & Signature Sound

Latin

41. Best Latin Pop or Urban Album

  • Winner: YHLQMDLG by Bad Bunny
  • Por Primera Vez by Camilo
  • Mesa Para Dos by Kany García
  • Pausa by Ricky Martin
  • 3:33 by Debi Nova

42. Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album

  • Aura by Bajofondo
  • Monstruo by Cami
  • Sobrevolando by Cultura Profética
  • Winner: La Conquista del Espacio by Fito Paez
  • Miss Colombia by Lido Pimienta

43. Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)

  • Hecho en Mexico by Alejandro Fernández
  • La Serenata by Lupita Infante
  • Winner: Un Canto Por Mexico, Vol. 1 by Natalia Lafourcade
  • Bailando Sones y Huapangos con Mariachi Sol de Mexico de Jose Hernandez by Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez
  • AYAYAY! by Christian Nodal

44. Best Tropical Latin Album

  • Mi Tumbao by José Alberto “El Ruiseñor”
  • Infinito by Edwin Bonilla
  • Sigo Cantando al Amor (Deluxe) by Jorge Celedon & Sergio Luis
  • Winner: 40 by Grupo Niche
  • Memorias de Navidad by Víctor Manuelle

American Roots Music

45. Best American Roots Performance

  • “Colors” by Black Pumas
  • “Deep In Love” by Bonny Light Horseman
  • “Short And Sweet” by Brittany Howard
  • “I’ll Be Gone” by Norah Jones & Mavis Staples
  • Winner: “I Remember Everything” by John Prine

46. Best American Roots Song

  • “Cabin” by Laura Rogers & Lydia Rogers, songwriters (The Secret Sisters)
  • “Ceiling To The Floor” by Sierra Hull & Kai Welch, songwriters (Sierra Hull)
  • “Hometown” by Sarah Jarosz, songwriter (Sarah Jarosz)
  • Winner: “I Remember Everything” by Pat McLaughlin & John Prine, songwriters (John Prine)
  • “Man Without A Soul” by Tom Overby & Lucinda Williams, songwriters (Lucinda Williams)

47. Best Americana Album

  • Old Flowers by Courtney Marie Andrews
  • Terms of Surrender by Hiss Golden Messenger
  • Winner: World on the Ground by Sarah Jarosz
  • El Dorado by Marcus King
  • Good Souls Better Angels by Lucinda Williams

48. Best Bluegrass Album

  • Man on Fire by Danny Barnes
  • To Live in Two Worlds, Vol. 1 by Thomm Jutz
  • North Carolina Songbook by Steep Canyon Rangers
  • Winner: Home by Billy Strings
  • The John Hartford Fiddle Tune Project, Vol. 1 by (Various Artists)Matt Combs & Katie Harford Hogue, producers

49. Best Traditional Blues Album

  • All My Dues Are Paid by Frank Bey
  • You Make Me Feel by Don Bryant
  • That’s What I Heard by Robert Cray Band
  • Cypress Grove by Jimmy “Duck” Holmes
  • Winner: Rawer Than Raw by Bobby Rush

50. Best Contemporary Blues Album

  • Winner: Have You Lost Your Mind Yet? by Fantastic Negrito
  • Live At The Paramount by Ruthie Foster Big Band
  • The Juice by G. Love
  • Blackbirds by Bettye LaVette
  • Up And Rolling by North Mississippi Allstars

51. Best Folk Album

  • Bonny Light Horseman by Bonny Light Horseman
  • Thanks For The Dance by Leonard Cohen
  • Song For Our Daughter by Laura Marling
  • Saturn Return by The Secret Sisters
  • Winner: All The Good Times by Gillian Welch & David Rawlings

52. Best Regional Roots Music Album

  • My Relatives “Nikso Kowaiks” by Black Lodge Singers
  • Cameron Dupuy And The Cajun Troubadours by Cameron Dupuy And The Cajun Troubadours
  • Lovely Sunrise by Nā Wai ʽEhā
  • Winner: Atmosphere by New Orleans Nightcrawlers
  • A Tribute to Al Berard by Sweet Cecilia

Reggae

53. Best Reggae Album

  • Upside Down 2020 by Buju Banton
  • Higher Place by Skip Marley
  • It All Comes Back To Love by Maxi Priest
  • Winner: Got To Be Tough by Toots & The Maytals
  • One World by The Wailers

Global Music

54. Best Global Music Album

  • Fu Chronicles by Antibalas
  • Winner: Twice As Tall by Burna Boy
  • Agora by Bebel Gilberto
  • Love Letters by Anoushka Shankar
  • Amadjar by Tinariwen

Children’s

55. Best Children’s Music Album

  • Winner: All The Ladies by Joanie Leeds
  • Wild Life by Justin Roberts

Spoken Word

56. Best Spoken Word Album (Includes Poetry, Audio Books & Storytelling)

  • Acid for the Children: A Memoir by Flea
  • Alex Trebek – The Answer Is… by Ken Jennings
  • Winner: Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, and the Richest, Most Destructive Industry on Earth by Rachel Maddow
  • Catch And Kill by Ronan Farrow
  • Charlotte’s Web (E.B. White) by Meryl Streep (& Full cast)

Comedy

57. Best Comedy Album

  • Winner: Black Mitzvah by Tiffany Haddish
  • I Love Everything by Patton Oswalt
  • The Pale Tourist by Jim Gaffigan
  • Paper Tiger by Bill Burr
  • 23 Hours To Kill by Jerry Seinfeld

Musical Theater

58. Best Musical Theater Album

  • Amélie (Original London Cast)
  • American Utopia on Broadway (David Byrne, composer & lyricist) (Original Cast)
  • Winner: Jagged Little Pill (Glen Ballard, composer; Alanis Morissette, composer & lyricist) (Original Broadway Cast)
  • Little Shop Of Horrors (Alan Menken, composer; Howard Ashman, lyricist) (The New Off-Broadway Cast)
  • The Prince of Egypt (Original Cast)
  • Soft Power (Original Cast)

Music for Visual Media

59. Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media

  • A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (Various Artists) Nate Heller, compilation producer; Howard Paar, Music Supervisor
  • Bill & Ted Face the Music (Various Artists) Jonathan Leahy, compilation producer
  • Eurovision Song Contest: The Story of Fire Saga (Various Artists) Savan Kotecha, compilation producer; Becky Bentham, music supervisor
  • Frozen 2 (Various Artists) Kristen Anderson-Lopez, Robert Lopez, Tom MacDougall & Dave Metzger, compilation producers 
  • Winner: Jojo Rabbit (Various Artists) Taika Waititi, compilation producer

60. Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media

  • Ad Astra by Max Richter, composer
  • Becoming by Kamasi Washington, composer
  • Winner: Joker by Hildur Guðnadóttir, composer
  • 1917 by Thomas Newman, composer
  • Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker by John Williams, composer

61. Best Song Written For Visual Media

  • “Beautiful Ghosts” by Andrew Lloyd Webber & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)
    Track from: Cats
  • “Carried Me With You” by Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth & Tim Hanseroth, songwriters (Brandi Carlile)
    Track from: Onward
  • “Into The Unknown” by Kristen Anderson-Lopez & Robert Lopez, songwriters (Idina Menzel & AURORA)
    Track from: Frozen 2
  • Winner: “No Time to Die” by Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas Baird O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)
    Track from:
    No Time to Die
  • “Stand Up” by Joshuah Brian Campbell & Cynthia Erivo, songwriters (Cynthia Erivo)
    Track from: Harriet

Composing/Arranging

62. Best Instrumental Composition

  • “Baby Jack” by Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra)
  • “Be Water II” by Christian Sands, composer (Christian Sands)
  • “Plumfield” by Alexandre Desplat, composer (Alexandre Desplat)
  • Winner: “Sputnik” by Maria Schneider, composer (Maria Schneider)
  • “Strata” by Remy Le Boeuf, composer (Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows Featuring Anna Webber & Eric Miller)

63. Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

  • “Bathroom Dance” by Hildur Guðnadóttir, arranger (Hildur Guðnadóttir)
  • Winner: “Donna Lee” by John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley)
  • “Honeymooners” by Remy Le Boeuf, arranger (Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows)
  • “Lift Every Voice and Sing” by Alvin Chea & Jarrett Johnson, arrangers (Jarrett Johnson Featuring Alvin Chea)
  • “Uranus: The Magician” by Jeremy Levy, arranger (Jeremy Levy Jazz Orchestra)

64. Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals

  • “Asas Fechadas” by John Beasley & Maria Mendes, arrangers (Maria Mendes Featuring John Beasley & Orkest Metropole)
  • “Desert Song” by Erin Bentlage, Sara Gazarek, Johnaye Kendrick & Amanda Taylor, arrangers (Säje)
  • “From This Place” by Alan Broadbent & Pat Metheny, arrangers (Pat Metheny Featuring Meshell Ndegeocello)
  • Winner: “He Won’t Hold You” by Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier Featuring Rapsody)
  • “Slow Burn” by Talia Billig, Nic Hard & Becca Stevens, arrangers (Becca Stevens Featuring Jacob Collier, Mark Lettieri, Justin Stanton, Jordan Perlson, Nic Hard, Keita Ogawa, Marcelo Woloski & Nate Werth)

Package

65. Best Recording Package

  • Everyday Life by Pilar Zeta, art director (Coldplay)
  • Funeral by Kyle Goen & Alex Kalatschinow, art directors (Lil Wayne)
  • Healer by Julian Gross & Hannah Hooper, art directors (Grouplove)
  • On Circles by Jordan Butcher, art director (Caspian)
  • Winner: Vols. 11 & 12 by Doug Cunningham & Jason Noto, art directors (Desert Sessions)

66. Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package

  • Flaming Pie (Collector’s Edition) by Linn Wie Andersen, Simon Earith, Paul McCartney & James Musgrave, art directors (Paul McCartney)
  • Giants Stadium 1987, 1989, 1991 by Lisa Glines & Doran Tyson, art directors (Grateful Dead)
  • Mode by Jeff Schulz & Paul A. Taylor, art directors (Depeche Mode)
  • Winner: Ode to Joy by Lawrence Azerrad & Jeff Tweedy, art directors (Wilco)
  • The Story of Ghostly International by Michael Cina & Molly Smith, art directors (Various Artists)

Notes

67. Best Album Notes

  • At the Minstrel Show: Minstrel Routines from the Studio, 1894-1926 by Tim Brooks, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • The Bakersfield Sound: Country Music Capital of the West, 1940-1974 by Scott B. Bomar, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • Winner: Dead Man’s Pop by Bob Mehr, album notes writer (The Replacements)
  • The Missing Link: How Gus Haenschen Got Us From Joplin to Jazz and Shaped the Music Business by Colin Hancock, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • Out of a Clear Blue Sky by David Sager, album notes writer (Nat Brusiloff)

Historical

68. Best Historical Album

  • Celebrated, 1895-1896 by Meagan Hennessey & Richard Martin, compilation producers; Richard Martin, mastering engineer (Unique Quartette)
  • Hittin’ the Ramp: The Early Years (1936-1943) by Zev Feldman, Will Friedwald & George Klabin, compilation producers; Matthew Lutthans, mastering engineer (Nat King Cole)
  • Winner: It’s Such A Good Feeling: The Best of Mister Rogers by Lee Lodyga & Cheryl Pawelski, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Mister Rogers)
  • 1999 Super Deluxe Edition by Trevor Guy, Michael Howe & Kirk Johnson, compilation producers; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Prince)
  • Souvenir by Carolyn Agger, compilation producer; Miles Showell, mastering engineer (Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark)
  • Throw Down Your Heart: The Complete Africa Sessions by Béla Fleck, compilation producer; Richard Dodd, mastering engineer (Béla Fleck)

Production, Non-Classical

69. Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

  • Black Hole Rainbow by Shawn Everett & Ivan Wayman, engineers; Bob Ludwig, mastering engineer (Devon Gilfillian)
  • Expectations by Gary Paczosa & Mike Robinson, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Katie Pruitt)
  • Winner: Hyperspace by Drew Brown, Julian Burg, Andrew Coleman, Paul Epworth, Shawn Everett, Serban Ghenea, David Greenbaum, John Hanes, Beck Hansen, Jaycen Joshua, Greg Kurstin, Mike Larson, Cole M.G.N., Alex Pasco & Matt Wiggins, engineers; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer (Beck)
  • Jaime by Shawn Everett, engineer; Shawn Everett, mastering engineer (Brittany Howard)
  • 25 Trips by Shani Gandhi & Gary Paczosa, engineers; Adam Grover, mastering engineer (Sierra Hull)

70. Producer Of The Year, Non-Classical

  • Jack Antonoff
  • Dan Auerback
  • Dave Cobb
  • Flying Lotus
  • Winner: Andrew Watt

71. Best Remixed Recording

  • “Do You Ever (RAC Mix)” by RAC, remixer (Phil Good)
  • “Imaginary Friends (Morgan Page Remix)” by Morgan Page, remixer (Deadmau5)
  • “Praying For You (Louie Vega Main Remix)” by Louie Vega, remixer (Jasper Street Co.)
  • Winner: “Roses (Imanbek Remix)” by Imanbek Zeikenov, remixer (SAINt JHN)
  • “Young & Alive (Bazzi Vs. Haywyre)” YOUNG & ALIVE (BAZZI VS. HAYWYRE REMIX)
  • Haywyre, remixer (Bazzi)

Production, Immersive Audio

72. Best Immersive Audio Album

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Best Immersive Audio Album Craft Committee was unable to meet. The judging of the entries in this category has been postponed until such time that we are able to meet in a way that is appropriate to judge the many formats and configurations of the entries and is safe for the committee members. The nominations for the 63rd GRAMMYs will be announced next year in addition to (and separately from) the 64th GRAMMY nominations in the category

Production, Classical

73. Best Engineered Album, Classical

  • Danielpour: The Passion of Yeshua
    Bernd Gottinger, engineer (JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)
  • Gershwin: Porgy and Bess
    David Frost & John Kerswell, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (David Robertson, Frederick Ballentine, Angel Blue, Denyce Graves, Latonia Moore, Eric Owens, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus)
  • Hynes: Fields
    Kyle Pyke, engineer; Jesse Lewis & Kyle Pyke, mastering engineers (Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion)
  • Ives: Complete Symphonies
    Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers; Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, mastering engineers (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic)
  • Winner: Shostakovich: Symphony No. 13, ‘Babi Yar’
    David Frost & Charlie Post, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra)

74. Producer Of The Year, Classical

  • Blanton Alspaugh
  • Winner: David Frost
  • Jesse Lewis
  • Dmitriy Lipay
  • Elaine Martone

Classical

75. Best Orchestral Performance

  • Aspects of America – Pulitzer Edition
    Carlos Kalmar, conductor (Oregon Symphony)
  • Concurrence
    Daníel Bjarnason, conductor (Iceland Symphony Orchestra)
  • Copland: Symphony No. 3
    Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony)
  • Winner: Ives: Complete Symphonies
    Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)
  • Lutosławski: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3
    Hannu Lintu, conductor (Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra)

76. Best Opera Recording

  • Dello Joio: The Trial at Rouen
    Gil Rose, conductor; Heather Buck & Stephen Powell; Gil Rose, producer (Boston Modern Orchestra Project; Odyssey Opera Chorus)
  • Floyd, C.: Prince of Players
    William Boggs, conductor; Alexander Dobson, Keith Phares & Kate Royal; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra; Florentine Opera Chorus)
  • Winner: Gershwin: Porgy and Bess
    David Robertson, conductor; Frederick Ballentine, Angel Blue, Denyce Graves, Latonia Moore & Eric Owens; David Frost, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus)
  • Handel: Agrippina
    Maxim Emelyanychev, conductor; Elsa Benoit, Joyce DiDonato, Franco Fagioli, Jakub Józef Orliński & Luca Pisaroni; Daniel Zalay, producer (Il Pomo D’Oro)
  • Zemlinsky: Der Zwerg
    Donald Runnicles, conductor; David Butt Philip & Elena Tsallagova; Peter Ghirardini & Erwin Stürzer, producers (Orchestra Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin; Chorus Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin)

77. Best Choral Performance

  • Carthage
    Donald Nally, conductor (The Crossing)
  • Winner: Danielpour: The Passion of Yeshuah
    JoAnn Falletta, conductor; James K. Bass & Adam Luebke, chorus masters (James K. Bass, J’Nai Bridges, Timothy Fallon, Kenneth Overton, Hila Plitmann & Matthew Worth; Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus & UCLA Chamber Singers)
  • Kastalsky: Requiem
    Leonard Slatkin, conductor; Charles Bruffy, Steven Fox & Benedict Sheehan, chorus masters (Joseph Charles Beutel & Anna Dennis; Orchestra Of St. Luke’s; Cathedral Choral Society, The Clarion Choir, Kansas City Chorale & The Saint Tikhon Choir)
  • Moravec: Sanctuary Road
    Kent Tritle, conductor (Joshua Blue, Raehann Bryce-Davis, Dashon Burton, Malcolm J. Merriweather & Laquita Mitchell; Oratorio Society Of New York Orchestra; Oratorio Society Of New York Chorus)
  • Once Upon A Time
    Matthew Guard, conductor (Sarah Walker; Skylark Vocal Ensemble)

78. Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance

  • Winner: Contemporary Voices
    Pacifica Quartet
  • Healing Modes
    Brooklyn Rider
  • Hearne, T.: Place
    Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods, Diana Wade & Place Orchestra
  • Hynes: Fields
    Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion
  • The Schumann Quartets
    Dover Quartet

79. Best Classical Instrumental Solo

  • Adès: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra
    Kirill Gerstein; Thomas Adès, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)
  • Beethoven: Complete Piano Sonatas
    Igor Levit
  • Bohemian Tales
    Augustin Hadelich; Jakub Hrůša, conductor (Charles Owen; Symphonieorchester Des Bayerischen Rundfunks)
  • Destination Rachimaninov – Arrival
    Daniil Trifonov; Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor (The Philadelphia Orchestra)
  • Winner: Theofanidis: Concerto for Viola and Chamber Orchestra
    Richard O’Neill; David Alan Miller, conductor (Albany Symphony)

80. Best Classical Solo Vocal Album

  • American Composers at Play – William Bolcom, Ricky Ian Gordon, Lori Laitman, John Musto
    Stephen Powell (Attacca Quartet, William Bolcom, Ricky Ian Gordon, Lori Laitman, John Musto, Charles Neidich & Jason Vieaux)
  • Clairières – Songs by Lili & Nadia Boulanger
    Nicholas Phan; Myra Huang, accompanist
  • Farinelli
    Cecilia Bartoli; Giovanni Antonini, conductor (Il Giardino Armonico)
  • A Lad’s Love
    Brian Giebler; Steven McGhee, accompanist (Katie Hyun, Michael Katz, Jessica Meyer, Reginald Mobley & Ben Russell)
  • Winner: Smyth: The Prison
    Sarah Brailey & Dashon Burton; James Blachly, conductor (Experiential Chorus; Experiential Orchestra)

81. Best Classical Compendium

  • Adès Conducts Adès
    Mark Stone & Christianne Stotijn; Thomas Adès, conductor; Nick Squire, producer
  • Saariaho: Graal Théâtre; Circle Map; Neiges; Vers Toi Qui Es Si Loin
    Clément Mao-Takacs, conductor; Hans Kipfer, producer
  • Serebrier: Symphonic Bach Variations; Laments and Hallelujahs; Flute Concerto
    José Serebrier, conductor; Jens Braun, producer
  • Winner: Thomas, M.T.: From the Diary of Anne Frank & Meditations on Rilke
    Isabel Leonard; Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Jack Vad, producer
  • Woolf, L.P.: Fire And Flood
    Matt Haimovitz; Julian Wachner, conductor; Blanton Alspaugh, producer

82. Best Contemporary Classical Composition

  • Adès: Concerto for Piano and Orchestra
    Thomas Adès, composer (Kirill Gerstein, Thomas Adès & Boston Symphony Orchestra)
  • Danielpour: The Passion of Yeshuah
    Richard Danielpour, composer (JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)
  • Floyd, C.: Prince of Players
    Carlisle Floyd, composer (William Boggs, Alexander Dobson, Kate Royal, Keith Phares, Florentine Opera Chorus & Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra)
  • Hearne, T.: Place
    Ted Hearne, composer (Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods & Place Orchestra)
  • Winner: Rouse: Symphony No. 5
    Christopher Rouse, composer (Giancarlo Guerrero & Nashville Symphony)

Music Video/Film

83. Best Music Video

  • Winner: “Brown Skin Girl”
    Beyoncé, Blue Ivy & WizKid
    Beyoncé Knowles-Carter & Jenn Nkiru, video directors; Astrid Edwards, Aya Kaida, Jean Mougin, Nathan Scherrer & Erinn Williams, video producers
  • “Life Is Good”
    Future Featuring Drake
    Julien Christian Lutz, video director; Harv Glazer, video producer
  • “Lockdown”
    Anderson .Paak
    Dave Meyers, video director; Nathan Scherrer, video producer
  • “Adore You”
    Harry Styles
    Dave Meyers, video director; Nathan Scherrer, video producer
  • “Goliath”
    Woodkid
    Yoann Lemoine, video director; Horace de Gunzbourg, video producer

84. Best Music Film

  • Beastie Boys Story
    Beastie Boys
    Spike Jonze, video director; Amanda Adelson, Jason Baum & Spike Jonze, video producers
  • Black Is King
    Beyoncé
    Emmanuel Adjei, Blitz Bazawule, Beyonce Knowles Carter & Kwasi Fordjour, video directors; Lauren Baker, Akin Omotoso, Nathan Scherrer, Jeremy Sullivan & Erinn Williams, video producers
  • We Are Freestyle Love Supreme
    Freestyle Love Supreme
    Andrew Fried, video director; Andrew Fried, Jill Furman, Thomas Kail, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Sarina Roma, Jenny Steingart & Jon Steingart, video producers
  • Winner: Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice
    Linda Ronstadt
    Rob Epstein & Jeffrey Friedman, video directors; Michele Farinola & James Keach, video producers
  • That Little Ol’ Band From Texas
    ZZ Top
    Sam Dunn, video director; Scot McFadyen, video producer
Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Beyoncé, Taylor Swift and Dua Lipa lead the 2021 Grammy nominations

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The Recording Academy announced its 2021 Grammy nominations on Tuesday, with Beyoncé, rising pop star Dua Lipa and stoner superstar Post Malone leading a diffuse field.

Beyoncé features on two songs in the record of the year category, which essentially rewards the year’s best single: the remix of Megan Thee Stallion’s “Savage” and her own “Black Parade.” The latter was also nominated for song of the year, which is awarded to the winner’s songwriters.

The Grammys made several changes to its structure this year, including increasing its voting membership by 2,300 and tweaking its nominations process after years of criticism over a lack of diversity amid the ceremony’s top categories. The moves were meant to “to evolve with the musical landscape and to ensure that the … nominating process and rules are more transparent and fair,” according to a statement on its website.

Beyoncé, seen here attending the 2020 pre-Grammy gala, received two record of the year nominations Tuesday | Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images

The Academy also made its rules and guidelines public for the first time, including definitions for previously murky eligibility requirements and voting guidelines. It also changed the names of several categories — the Latin Pop Album category was renamed to the slightly more-inclusive Best Latin Pop Or Urban Album — and instituted a method for flagging conflicts of interest on its still-secretive Nominations Review Committees, whose members are not made public.

In addition, the Academy made several personnel changes, most notably the firing its first female CEO, Deborah Dugan, after less than a year on the job. Dugan had accused the Academy of being “rigged” and “corrupt,” while the Academy had said she was terminated following a confidential investigation into allegations that Dugan had bullied a senior member of the Academy. Former Google executive Valeisha Butterfield Jones was appointed to Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer, a new position created in response to recommendations made by a task force focused on diversity and inclusion. She will “design, build and implement world-class programs and industry standards focused on inclusion, belonging and representation for underrepresented communities and creators.”

The results of these efforts at the top of the marquee are mixed. The eight nominations in the album of the year category, for example, are gender-diverse but mostly white, save for the rock group Black Pumas and the multi-racial pop singer Jhene Aiko. Record of the year nominees form a richer field, including the fast-rising rapper DaBaby, pop provocateur Doja Cat, and the aforementioned Megan Thee Stallion. All of the nominees for best pop vocal album are white artists.

In a sign of ostensible forward motion for the organization, however, this year’s nominees for best new artist might actually be new to most people. Country artist Ingrid Andress released her debut album, Lady Like, this year; Phoebe Bridgers is a highly respected indie artist, whose album Punisher broke into the top 50 of Billboard’s 200 albums chart this year; fans of the Tiny Desk may recognize Chika, a Nigerian-American rapper; this makes Noah Cyrus’ second year of being up for a best new artist award (after the MTV Video Music Awards in 2017); D Smoke turned a win on a music competition show into real cultural relevancy; Doja Cat has parlayed a viral hit into a proper career; Kaytranada is another confusing choice for best new artist, considering the length of his resume; and finally, Megan Thee Stallion, who likely needs no introduction.

The 2021 Grammy Award Nominations

Record Of The Year

Awarded to the artist and producer(s), recording engineer(s), mixer(s) and mastering engineer(s), if other than the artist.

  • “Black Parade” — Beyoncé
  • “Colors” — Black Pumas
  • “Rockstar” — DaBaby Featuring Roddy Ricch
  • “Say So” — Doja Cat
  • “Everything I Wanted” — Billie Eilish
  • “Don’t Start Now” — Dua Lipa
  • “Circles” — Post Malone
  • “Savage” — Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé

Song Of The Year

A songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Recording artists’ names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Black Parade” — Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, songwriters (Beyoncé)
  • “The Box” — Samuel Gloade & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (Roddy Ricch)
  • “Cardigan” — Aaron Dessner & Taylor Swift, songwriters (Taylor Swift)
  • “Circles” — Louis Bell, Adam Feeney, Kaan Gunesberk, Austin Post & Billy Walsh, songwriters (Post Malone)
  • “Don’t Start Now” — Caroline Ailin, Ian Kirkpatrick, Dua Lipa & Emily Warren, songwriters (Dua Lipa)
  • “Everything I Wanted” — Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)
  • “I Can’t Breathe” — Dernst Emile II, H.E.R. & Tiara Thomas, songwriters (H.E.R.)
  • “If The World Was Ending” — Julia Michaels & JP Saxe, songwriters (JP Saxe Featuring Julia Michaels)

Album Of The Year

Awarded to artist(s) and to featured artist(s), songwriter(s) of new material, producer(s), recording engineer(s), mixing and mastering engineer(s) credited with at least 33% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

  • Chilombo — Jhené Aiko
  • Black Pumas (Deluxe Edition) — Black Pumas
  • Everyday Life — Coldplay
  • Djesse Vol. 3 — Jacob Collier
  • Women In Music Pt. III — Haim
  • Future Nostalgia — Dua Lipa
  • Hollywood’s Bleeding — Post Malone
  • Folklore — Taylor Swift

Best New Artist

This category recognizes an artist whose eligibility-year release(s) achieved a breakthrough into the public consciousness and notably impacted the musical landscape.

  • Ingrid Andress
  • Phoebe Bridgers
  • Chika
  • Noah Cyrus
  • D Smoke
  • Doja Cat
  • Kaytranada
  • Megan Thee Stallion

Best Pop Duo/Group Performance

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative pop recordings. Singles or tracks only.

  • “Un Dia (One Day)” — J Balvin, Dua Lipa, Bad Bunny & Tainy
  • “Intentions” — Justin Bieber Featuring Quavo
  • “Dynamite” — BTS
  • “Rain On Me” — Lady Gaga with Ariana Grande
  • “Exile” — Taylor Swift Featuring Bon Iver

Best Pop Vocal Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing of new pop vocal recordings.

  • Changes — Justin Bieber
  • Chromatica — Lady Gaga
  • Future Nostalgia — Dua Lipa
  • Fine Line — Harry Styles
  • Folklore — Taylor Swift

Best Dance/Electronic Album

For vocal or instrumental albums.

  • Kick I — Arca
  • Planet’s Mad — Baauer
  • Energy — Disclosure
  • Bubba — Kaytranada
  • Good Faith — Madeon

Best Rock Performance

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative rock recordings.

  • “Shameika” — Fiona Apple
  • “Not” — Big Thief
  • “Kyoto” — Phoebe Bridgers
  • “The Steps” — HAIM
  • “Stay High” — Brittany Howard
  • “Daylight” — Grace Potter

Best Progressive R&B Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded progressive vocal tracks derivative of R&B.

  • Chilombo —Jhené Aiko
  • Ungodly Hour — Chloe X Halle
  • Free Nationals — Free Nationals
  • F*** Yo Feelings — Robert Glasper
  • It Is What It Is — Thundercat

Best Rap Performance

For a rap performance. Singles or tracks only.

  • “Deep Reverence” — Big Sean Featuring Nipsey Hussle
  • “Bop” — DaBaby
  • “What’s Poppin” — Jack Harlow
  • “The Bigger Picture” — Lil Baby
  • “Savage” — Megan Thee Stallion Featuring Beyoncé
  • “Dior” — Pop Smoke

Best Country Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new country recordings.

  • Lady Like— Ingrid Andress
  • Your Life Is A Record— Brandy Clark
  • Wildcard — Miranda Lambert
  • Nightfall— Little Big Town
  • Never Will — Ashley McBryde

Best Jazz Vocal Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal jazz recordings.

  • Ona — Thana Alexa
  • Secrets Are The Best Stories — Kurt Elling Featuring Danilo Pérez
  • Modern Ancestors — Carmen Lundy
  • Holy Room: Live At Alte Oper — Somi With Frankfurt Radio Big Band
  • What’s The Hurry — Kenny Washington

Best Latin Pop or Urban Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin pop or urban recordings.

  • YHLQMDLG— Bad Bunny
  • Por Primera Vez — Camilo
  • Mesa Para Dos — Kany García
  • Pausa — Ricky Martin
  • 3:33 — Debi Nova

Best Americana Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental Americana recordings.

  • Old Flowers — Courtney Marie Andrews
  • Terms Of Surrender — Hiss Golden Messenger
  • World On The Ground — Sarah Jarosz
  • El Dorado — Marcus King
  • Good Souls Better Angels — Lucinda Williams

Best Contemporary Blues Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental contemporary blues recordings.

  • Have You Lost Your Mind Yet? — Fantastic Negrito
  • Live At The Paramount — Ruthie Foster Big Band
  • The Juice — G. Love
  • Blackbirds — Bettye LaVette
  • Up And Rolling — North Mississippi Allstars

Best Global Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental global music recordings.

  • FU Chronicles — Antibalas
  • Twice As Tall — Burna Boy
  • Agora — Bebel Gilberto
  • Love Letters — Anoushka Shankar
  • Amadjar — Tinariwen

Best Spoken Word Album

Includes poetry, audio books and storytelling.

  • Acid For The Children: A Memoir — Flea
  • Alex Trebek – The Answer Is… — Ken Jennings
  • Blowout: Corrupted Democracy, Rogue State Russia, And The Richest, Most Destructive Industry On Earth — Rachel Maddow
  • Catch And Kill — Ronan Farrow
  • Charlotte’s Web (E.B. White) — Meryl Streep (& Full Cast)

Best Music Film

For concert/performance films or music documentaries. Award to the artist, video director and video producer.

  • Beastie Boys Story — Beastie Boys
  • Black Is King — Beyoncé
  • We Are Freestyle Love Supreme — Freestyle Love Supreme
  • Linda Ronstadt: The Sound Of My Voice — Linda Ronstadt
  • That Little Ol’ Band From Texas — ZZ Top

Best Pop Solo Performance

For new vocal or instrumental pop recordings. Singles or tracks only.

  • “Yummy” — Justin Bieber
  • “Say So” — Doja Cat
  • “Everything I Wanted” — Billie Eilish
  • “Don’t Start Now” — Dua Lipa
  • “Watermelon Sugar” — Harry Styles
  • “Cardigan” — Taylor Swift

Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new traditional pop recordings.

  • Blue Umbrella — (Burt Bacharach &) Daniel Tashian
  • True Love: A Celebration Of Cole Porter — Harry Connick, Jr.
  • American Standard — James Taylor
  • Unfollow The Rules — Rufus Wainwright
  • Judy — Renée Zellweger

Best Dance Recording

For solo, duo, group or collaborative performances. Vocal or instrumental. Singles or tracks only.

  • “On My Mind” — Diplo & SIDEPIECE (Diplo & SIDEPIECE, producers; Luca Pretolesi, mixer)
  • “My High” — Disclosure ft. Aminé & Slowthai (Guy Lawrence & Howard Lawrence, producers; Guy Lawrence, mixer)
  • “The Difference” — Flume ft. Toro y Moi (Flume, producer; Eric J Dubowsky, mixer)
  • “Both Of Us” — Jayda G (Fred Again.. & Jayda G, producers; Fred Again.. & Jayda G, mixers)
  • “10%” — Kaytranada ft. Kali Uchis (Kaytranada, producer; Neal H. Pogue, mixer)

Best Contemporary Instrumental Album

For albums containing approximately 51% or more playing time of instrumental material. For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

  • Axiom — Christian Scott Atunde Adjuah
  • Chronology Of A Dream: Live At The Village Vanguard — Jon Batiste
  • Take The Stairs — Black Violin
  • Americana — Grégoire Maret, Romain Collin & Bill Frisell
  • Live At The Royal Albert Hall — Snarky Puppy

Best Metal Performance

For new vocal or instrumental solo, duo/group or collaborative metal recordings.

  • “Bum-Rush” — Body Count
  • “Underneath” — Code Orange
  • “The In-Between” — In This Moment
  • “Bloodmoney” — Poppy
  • “Executioner’s Tax (Swing Of The Axe) – Live” — Power Trip

Best Rock Song

A songwriter(s) Award. Includes rock, hard rock and metal songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Kyoto” — Phoebe Bridgers, Morgan Nagler & Marshall Vore, songwriters (Phoebe Bridgers)
  • “Lost In Yesterday” — Kevin Parker, songwriter (Tame Impala)
  • “Not” — Adrianne Lenker, songwriter (Big Thief)
  • “Shameika” — Fiona Apple, songwriter (Fiona Apple)
  • “Stay High” — Brittany Howard, songwriter (Brittany Howard)

Best Rock Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rock, hard

rock or metal recordings.

  • A Hero’s Death — Fontaines D.C.
  • Kiwanuka — Michael Kiwanuka
  • Daylight — Grace Potter
  • Sound & Fury — Sturgill Simpson
  • The New Abnormal — The Strokes

Best Alternative Music Album

Vocal or instrumental.

  • Fetch The Bolt Cutters — Fiona Apple
  • Hyperspace — Beck
  • Punisher — Phoebe Bridgers
  • Jaime — Brittany Howard
  • The Slow Rush — Tame Impala

Best R&B Performance

For new vocal or instrumental R&B recordings.

  • “Lightning & Thunder” — Jhené Aiko ft. John Legend
  • “Black Parade” — Beyoncé
  • “All I Need” — Jacob Collier ft. Mahalia & Ty Dolla $Ign
  • “Goat Head” — Brittany Howard
  • “See Me” — Emily King

Best Traditional R&B Performance

For new vocal or instrumental traditional R&B recordings.

  • “Sit On Down” — The Baylor Project ft. Jean Baylor & Marcus Baylor
  • “Wonder What She Thinks Of Me” — Chloe X Halle
  • “Let Me Go” — Mykal Kilgore
  • “Anything For You” — Ledisi
  • “Distance” — Yebba

Best R&B Song

A songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Better Than I Imagine” — Robert Glasper, Meshell Ndegeocello & Gabriella Wilson, Songwriters (Robert Glasper Ft. H.E.R. & Meshell Ndegeocello)
  • “Black Parade” — Denisia Andrews, Beyoncé, Stephen Bray, Shawn Carter, Brittany Coney, Derek James Dixie, Akil King, Kim “Kaydence” Krysiuk & Rickie “Caso” Tice, Songwriters (Beyoncé)
  • “Collide” — Sam Barsh, Stacey Barthe, Sonyae Elise, Olu Fann, Akil King, Josh Lopez, Kaveh Rastegar & Benedetto Rotondi, Songwriters (Tiana Major9 & Earthgang)
  • “Do It”  — Chloe Bailey, Halle Bailey, Anton Kuhl, Victoria Monét, Scott Storch & Vincent Van Den Ende, Songwriters (Chloe X Halle)
  • “Slow Down” — Nasri Atweh, Badriia Bourelly, Skip Marley, Ryan Williamson & Gabriella Wilson, Songwriters (Skip Marley & H.E.R.)

Best R&B Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new R&B recordings.

  • Happy 2 Be Here — Ant Clemons
  • Take Time — Giveon
  • To Feel Love/D — Luke James
  • Bigger Love — John Legend
  • All Rise — Gregory Porter

Best Melodic Rap Performance

For a solo or collaborative performance containing both elements of R&B melodies and rap.

  • “Rockstar” — DaBaby ft. Roddy Ricch
  • “Laugh Now, Cry Later” Drake ft. Lil Durk
  • “Lockdown” — Anderson .Paak
  • “The Box” — Roddy Ricch
  • “Highest In The Room” — Travis Scott

Best Rap Song

A songwriter(s) award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “The Bigger Picture” — Dominique Jones, Noah Pettigrew & Rai’shaun Williams, songwriters (Lil Baby)
  • “The Box” — Samuel Gloade & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (Roddy Ricch)
  • “Laugh Now, Cry Later” — Durk Banks, Rogét Chahayed, Aubrey Graham, Daveon Jackson, Ron Latour & Ryan Martinez, songwriters (Drake ft. Lil Durk)
  • “Rockstar” — Jonathan Lyndale Kirk, Ross Joseph Portaro Iv & Rodrick Moore, songwriters (Dababy ft. Roddy Ricch)
  • “Savage” — Beyoncé, Shawn Carter, Brittany Hazzard, Derrick Milano, Terius Nash, Megan Pete, Bobby Session Jr., Jordan Kyle Lanier Thorpe & Anthony White, songwriters (Megan Thee Stallion Ft. Beyoncé)

Best Rap Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new rap recordings.

  • Black Habits — D Smoke
  • Alfredo — Freddie Gibbs & The Alchemist
  • A Written Testimony — Jay Electronica
  • King’s Disease — Nas
  • The Allegory — Royce Da 5’9″

Best Country Solo Performance

For new vocal or instrumental solo country recordings.

  • “Stick That In Your Country Song” — Eric Church
  • “Who You Thought I Was” — Brandy Clark
  • “When My Amy Prays — Vince Gill
  • “Black Like Me” — Mickey Guyton
  • “Bluebird” — Miranda Lambert

Best Country Duo/Group Performance

For new vocal or instrumental duo/group or collaborative country recordings.

  • “All Night” — Brothers Osborne
  • “10,000 Hours” — Dan + Shay & Justin Bieber
  • “Ocean” — Lady A
  • “Sugar Coat” — Little Big Town
  • “Some People Do” — Old Dominion

Best Country Song

A songwriter(s) Award. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Bluebird” — Luke Dick, Natalie Hemby & Miranda Lambert, songwriters (Miranda Lambert)
  • “The Bones” — Maren Morris, Jimmy Robbins & Laura Veltz, songwriters (Maren Morris)
  • “Crowded Table” — Brandi Carlile, Natalie Hemby & Lori Mckenna, songwriters (The Highwomen)
  • “More Hearts Than Mine” — Ingrid Andress, Sam Ellis & Derrick Southerland, songwriters (Ingrid Andress)
  • “Some People Do” — Jesse Frasure, Shane Mcanally, Matthew Ramsey & Thomas Rhett, songwriters (Old Dominion)

Best New Age Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental new age recordings.

  • Songs From The Bardo — Laurie Anderson, Tenzin Choegyal & Jesse Paris Smith
  • Periphery — Priya Darshini
  • Form//Less — Superposition
  • More Guitar Stories — Jim “Kimo” West
  • Meditations — Cory Wong & Jon Batiste

Best Improvised Jazz Solo

For an instrumental jazz solo performance. Two equal performers on one recording may be eligible as one entry. If the soloist listed appears on a recording billed to another artist, the latter’s name is in parenthesis for identification. Singles or tracks only.

  • “Guinevere” — Christian Scott Atunde Adjuah, soloist
  • “Pachamama” — Regina Carter, soloist
  • “Celia” — Gerald Clayton, soloist
  • “All Blues” — Chick Corea, soloist
  • “Moe Honk” — Joshua Redman, soloist

Best Jazz Instrumental Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new instrumental jazz recordings.

  • On The Tender Spot Of Every Calloused Moment — Ambrose Akinmusire
  • Waiting Game — Terri Lyne Carrington And Social Science
  • Happening: Live At The Village Vanguard — Gerald Clayton
  • Trilogy 2 — Chick Corea, Christian Mcbride & Brian Blade
  • Roundagain — Redman Mehldau Mcbride Blade

Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new ensemble jazz recordings.

  • Dialogues On Race — Gregg August
  • Monk’estra Plays John Beasley — John Beasley
  • The Intangible Between — Orrin Evans And The Captain Black Big Band
  • Songs You Like A Lot — John Hollenbeck With Theo Bleckmann, Kate
  • Mcgarry, Gary Versace And The Frankfurt Radio Big Band
  • Data Lords — Maria Schneider Orchestra

Best Latin Jazz Album

For vocal or instrumental albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded material. The intent of this category is to recognize recordings that represent the blending of jazz with Latin, Iberian-American, Brazilian, and Argentinian tango music.

  • Tradiciones — Afro-peruvian Jazz Orchestra
  • Four Questions — Arturo O’farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra
  • City Of Dreams — Chico Pinheiro
  • Viento Y Tiempo – Live At Blue Note Tokyo — Gonzalo Rubalcaba & Aymée Nuviola
  • Trane’s Delight — Poncho Sanchez

Best Gospel Performance/Song

This award is given to the artist(s) and songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best traditional Christian, roots gospel or contemporary gospel single or track.

  • “Wonderful Is Your Name” — Melvin Crispell III
  • “Release (Live)” — Ricky Dillard Ft. Tiff Joy; David Frazier, songwriter
  • “Come Together” — Rodney “Darkchild” Jerkins Presents: The Good News; Lashawn Daniels, Rodney Jerkins, Lecrae Moore & Jazz Nixon, songwriters
  • “Won’t Let Go” — Travis Greene; Travis Greene, songwriter
  • “Movin’ On” — Jonathan Mcreynolds & Mali Music; Darryl L. Howell, Jonathan Caleb Mcreynolds, Kortney Jamaal Pollard & Terrell Demetrius Wilson, songwriters

Best Contemporary Christian Music Performance/Song

This award is given to the artist(s) and songwriter(s) (for new compositions) for the best contemporary Christian music single or track, (including pop, rap/hip-hop, Latin, or rock.)

  • “The Blessing (Live)” — Kari Jobe, Cody Carnes & Elevation Worship; Chris Brown, Cody Carnes, Kari Jobe Carnes & Steven Furtick, songwriters
  • “Sunday Morning” — Lecrae Featuring Kirk Franklin; Denisia Andrews, Jones Terrence Antonio, Saint Bodhi, Brittany Coney, Kirk Franklin, Lasanna Harris, Shama Joseph, Stuart Lowery, Lecrae Moore & Nathanael Saint-fleur, songwriters
  • “Holy Water” — We The Kingdom; Andrew Bergthold, Ed Cash, Franni Cash, Martin Cash & Scott Cash, songwriters
  • “Famous For (I Believe)” — Tauren Wells Featuring Jenn Johnson; Chuck Butler, Krissy Nordhoff, Jordan Sapp, Alexis Slifer & Tauren Wells, songwriters
  • “There Was Jesus” — Zach Williams & Dolly Parton; Casey Beathard, Jonathan Smith & Zach Williams, songwriters

Best Gospel Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional or contemporary/R&B gospel music recordings.

  • 2econd Wind: Ready — Anthony Brown & Group Therapy
  • My Tribute — Myron Butler
  • Choirmaster — Ricky Dillard
  • Gospel According To PJ — PJ Morton
  • Kierra — Kierra Sheard

Best Contemporary Christian Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, contemporary Christian music, including pop, rap/hip hop, Latin, or rock recordings.

  • Run To The Father — Cody Carnes
  • All Of My Best Friends — Hillsong Young & Free
  • Holy Water — We The Kingdom
  • Citizen Of Heaven — Tauren Wells
  • Jesus Is King — Kanye West

Best Roots Gospel Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of newly recorded, vocal, traditional/roots gospel music, including country, Southern gospel, bluegrass, and Americana recordings.

  • Beautiful Day — Mark Bishop
  • 20/20 — The Crabb Family
  • What Christmas Really Means — The Erwins
  • Celebrating Fisk! (The 150th Anniversary Album) — Fisk Jubilee Singers
  • Something Beautiful — Ernie Haase & Signature Sound

Best Latin Rock or Alternative Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new Latin rock or alternative recordings.

  • Aura — Bajofondo
  • Monstruo — Cami
  • Sobrevolando — Cultura Profética
  • La Conquista Del Espacio — Fito Paez
  • Miss Colombia — Lido Pimienta

Best Regional Mexican Music Album (Including Tejano)

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new regional Mexican (banda, norteño, corridos, gruperos, mariachi, ranchera and Tejano) recordings.

  • Hecho En México — Alejandro Fernández
  • La Serenata — Lupita Infante
  • Un Canto Por México, Vol. 1 — Natalia Lafourcade
  • Bailando Sones Y Huapangos Con — Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez — Mariachi Sol De Mexico De Jose Hernandez
  • Ayayay! — Christian Nodal

Best Tropical Latin Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new tropical Latin recordings.

  • Mi Tumbao — José Alberto “El Ruiseñor”
  • Infinito — Edwin Bonilla
  • Sigo Cantando Al Amor (Deluxe) — Jorge Celedon & Sergio Luis
  • 40 — Grupo Niche
  • Memorias De Navidad — Víctor Manuelle

Best American Roots Performance

For new vocal or instrumental American roots recordings. This is for performances in the style of any of the subgenres encompassed in the American roots music field including Americana, bluegrass, blues, folk or regional roots. Award to the artist(s).

  • “Colors” — Black Pumas
  • “Deep In Love” — Bonny Light Horseman
  • “Short And Sweet” — Brittany Howard
  • “I’ll Be Gone” — Norah Jones & Mavis Staples
  • “I Remember Everything” — John Prine

Best American Roots Song

A songwriter(s) Award. Includes Americana, bluegrass, traditional blues, contemporary blues, folk or regional roots songs. A song is eligible if it was first released or if it first achieved prominence during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Cabin” — Laura Rogers & Lydia Rogers, songwriters (The Secret Sisters)
  • “Ceiling To The Floor” — Sierra Hull & Kai Welch, songwriters (Sierra Hull)
  • “Hometown” — Sarah Jarosz, Songwriter (Sarah Jarosz)
  • “I Remember Everything” — Pat Mclaughlin & John Prine, songwriters (John
  • Prine)
  • “Man Without A Soul” — Tom Overby & Lucinda Williams, songwriters (Lucinda
  • Williams)

Best Bluegrass Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental bluegrass recordings.

  • Man On Fire — Danny Barnes
  • To Live In Two Worlds, Vol. 1 — Thomm Jutz
  • North Carolina Songbook — Steep Canyon Rangers
  • Home — Billy Strings
  • The John Hartford Fiddle Tune Project, Vol. 1 — (Various Artists)

Best Traditional Blues Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental traditional blues recordings.

  • All My Dues Are Paid — Frank Bey
  • You Make Me Feel — Don Bryant
  • That’s What I Heard — Robert Cray Band
  • Cypress Grove — Jimmy “Duck” Holmes
  • Rawer Than Raw — Bobby Rush

Best Folk Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental folk recordings.

  • Bonny Light Horseman — Bonny Light Horseman
  • Thanks For The Dance — Leonard Cohen
  • Song For Our Daughter — Laura Marling
  • Saturn Return — The Secret Sisters
  • All The Good Times — Gillian Welch & David Rawlings

Best Regional Roots Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new vocal or instrumental regional roots music recordings.

  • My Relatives “Nikso Kowaiks” — Black Lodge Singers
  • Cameron Dupuy And The Cajun Troubadours — Cameron Dupuy And The Cajun Troubadours
  • Lovely Sunrise — Nā Wai ʽehā
  • Atmosphere — New Orleans Nightcrawlers
  • A Tribute To Al Berard — Sweet Cecilia

Best Reggae Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new reggae recordings.

  • Upside Down 2020 — Buju Banton
  • Higher Place — Skip Marley
  • It All Comes Back To Love — Maxi Priest
  • Got To Be Tough — Toots & The Maytals
  • One World — The Wailers

Best Children’s Music Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new musical or spoken word recordings that are created and intended specifically for children.

  • All The Ladies — Joanie Leeds
  • Be A Pain: An Album For Young (And Old) Leaders — Alastair Moock And Friends
  • I’m An Optimist — Dog On Fleas
  • Songs For Singin’ — The Okee Dokee Brothers
  • Wild Life — Justin Roberts

Best Comedy Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings.

  • Black Mitzvah — Tiffany Haddish
  • I Love Everything — Patton Oswalt
  • The Pale Tourist — Jim Gaffigan
  • Paper Tiger — Bill Burr
  • 23 Hours To Kill — Jerry Seinfeld

Best Musical Theater Album

For albums containing at least 51% playing time of new recordings. Award to the principal vocalist(s) and the album producer(s) of 51% or more playing time of the album. The lyricist(s) and composer(s) of a new score are eligible for an Award if they have written and/or composed a new score which comprises 51% or more playing time of the album.

  • Amélie — Audrey Brisson, Chris Jared, Caolan McCarthy & Jez Unwin, principal soloists; Michael Fentiman, Sean Patrick Flahaven, Barnaby Race & Nathan Tysen, producers; Nathan Tysen, lyricist; Daniel Messe, composer & lyricist (Original London Cast)
  • American Utopia On Broadway — David Byrne, principal soloist; David Byrne, producer (David Byrne, composer & lyricist) (Original Cast)
  • Jagged Little Pill — Kathryn Gallagher, Celia Rose Gooding, Lauren Patten & Elizabeth Stanley, principal soloists; Neal Avron, Pete Ganbarg, Tom Kitt, Michael Parker, Craig Rosen & Vivek J. Tiwary, producers (Glen Ballard & Alanis Morissette, lyricists) (Original Broadway Cast)
  • Little Shop Of Horrors — Tammy Blanchard, Jonathan Groff & Tom Alan Robbins, principal soloists; Will Van Dyke, Michael Mayer, Alan Menken & Frank Wolf, producers (Alan Menken, composer; Howard Ashman, lyricist) (The New Off-Broadway Cast)
  • The Prince Of Egypt — Christine Allado, Luke Brady, Alexia Khadime & Liam Tamne, principal soloists; Dominick Amendum & Stephen Schwartz, producers; Stephen Schwartz, composer & lyricist (Original Cast)
  • Soft Power — Francis Jue, Austin Ku, Alyse Alan Louis & Conrad Ricamora, principal soloists; Matt Stine, producer; David Henry Hwang, lyricist; Jeanine Tesori, composer & lyricist (Original Cast)

Best Compilation Soundtrack For Visual Media

Award to the artist(s) and/or ‘in studio’ producer(s) of a majority of the tracks on the album. In the absence of both, award to the one or two individuals proactively responsible for the concept and musical direction of the album and for the selection of artists, songs and producers, as applicable. Award also goes to appropriately credited music supervisor(s).

  • A Beautiful Day In The Neighborhood — (Various Artists)
  • Bill & Ted Face The Music — (Various Artists)
  • Eurovision Song Contest: The Story Of Fire Saga — (Various Artists)
  • Frozen 2 — (Various Artists)
  • Jojo Rabbit — (Various Artists)

Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media

Award to composer(s) for an original score created specifically for, or as a companion to, a current legitimate motion picture, television show or series, video games or other visual media.

  • Ad Astra — Max Richter, composer
  • Becoming — Kamasi Washington, composer
  • Joker — Hildur Guðnadóttir, composer
  • 1917 — Thomas Newman, composer
  • Star Wars: The Rise Of Skywalker — John Williams, composer

Best Song Written For Visual Media

A songwriter(s) award. For a song (melody & lyrics) written specifically for a motion picture, television, video games or other visual media, and released for the first time during the eligibility year. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Beautiful Ghosts” [From Cats] — Andrew Lloyd Webber & Taylor Swift, songwriters
  • (Taylor Swift)
  • “Carried Me With You” [From Onward] — Brandi Carlile, Phil Hanseroth & Tim Hanseroth, songwriters (Brandi Carlile)
  • “Into The Unknown” [From Frozen 2] — Kristen Anderson-Lopez & Robert Lopez, songwriters (Idina Menzel & AURORA)
  • “No Time To Die” [From No Time To Die] — Billie Eilish O’Connell & Finneas Baird O’Connell, songwriters (Billie Eilish)
  • “Stand Up” [From Harriet] — Joshuah Brian Campbell & Cynthia Erivo, songwriters
  • (Cynthia Erivo)

Best Instrumental Composition

A composer’s award for an original composition (not an

adaptation) first released during the eligibility year. Singles or tracks only.

  • “Baby Jack” —  Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill & The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra)
  • “Be Water Ii” — Christian Sands, composer (Christian Sands)
  • “Plumfield” — Alexandre Desplat, composer (Alexandre Desplat)
  • “Sputnik” — Maria Schneider, composer (Maria Schneider)
  • “Strata” — Remy Le Boeuf, composer (Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows Featuring Anna Webber & Eric Miller)

Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella

An arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Bathroom Dance” — Hildur Guðnadóttir, arranger (Hildur Guðnadóttir)
  • “Donna Lee” — John Beasley, arranger (John Beasley)
  • “Honeymooners” — Remy Le Boeuf, arranger (Remy Le Boeuf’s Assembly Of Shadows)
  • “Lift Every Voice And Sing” — Alvin Chea & Jarrett Johnson, arrangers (Jarrett Johnson Featuring Alvin Chea)
  • “Uranus: The Magician” — Jeremy Levy, arranger (Jeremy Levy Jazz Orchestra)

Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals

An arranger’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Asas Fechadas” — John Beasley & Maria Mendes, arrangers (Maria Mendes ft. John Beasley & Orkest Metropole)
  • “Desert Song” — Erin Bentlage, Sara Gazarek, Johnaye Kendrick & Amanda Taylor, arrangers (Säje)
  • “From This Place” — Alan Broadbent & Pat Metheny, arrangers (Pat Metheny ft. Meshell Ndegeocello)
  • “He Won’t Hold You” — Jacob Collier, arranger (Jacob Collier ft. Rapsody)
  • “Slow Burn” — Talia Billig, Nic Hard & Becca Stevens, arrangers (Becca Stevens Featuring Jacob Collier, Mark Lettieri, Justin Stanton, Jordan Perlson, Nic Hard, Keita Ogawa, Marcelo Woloski & Nate Werth)

Best Recording Package

  • Everyday Life — Pilar Zeta, art director (Coldplay)
  • Funeral — Kyle Goen, art director (Lil Wayne)
  • Healer — Julian Gross & Hannah Hooper, art directors (Grouplove)
  • On Circles — Jordan Butcher, art director (Caspian)
  • Vols. 11 & 12 — Doug Cunningham & Jason Noto, art directors (Desert Sessions)

Best Boxed Or Special Limited Edition Package

  • Flaming Pie (Collector’s Edition) — Linn Wie Andersen, Simon Earith, Paul McCartney & James Musgrave, art directors (Paul McCartney)
  • Giants Stadium 1987, 1989, 1991 — Lisa Glines & Doran Tyson, art directors (Grateful Dead)
  • Mode — Jeff Schulz, art director (Depeche Mode)
  • Ode To Joy — Lawrence Azerrad & Jeff Tweedy, art directors (Wilco)
  • The Story Of Ghostly International — Michael Cina & Molly Smith, art directors (Various
  • Artists)

Best Album Notes

  • At The Minstrel Show: Minstrel Routines From The Studio, 1894-1926 — Tim Brooks, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • The Bakersfield Sound: Country Music Capital Of The West, 1940-1974 — Scott B. Bomar, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • Dead Man’s Pop — Bob Mehr, album notes writer (The Replacements)
  • The Missing Link: How Gus Haenschen Got Us From Joplin To Jazz And Shaped The Music Business — Colin Hancock, album notes writer (Various Artists)
  • Out Of A Clear Blue Sky — David Sager, album notes writer (Nat Brusiloff)

Best Historical Album

  • Celebrated, 1895-1896 — Meagan Hennessey & Richard Martin, compilation producers; Richard Martin, mastering engineer (Unique Quartette)
  • Hittin’ The Ramp: The Early Years (1936 – 1943) — Zev Feldman, Will Friedwald & George Klabin, compilation producers; Matthew Lutthans, mastering engineer (Nat King Cole)
  • It’s Such A Good Feeling: The Best Of Mister Rogers — Lee Lodyga & Cheryl Pawelski, compilation producers; Michael Graves, mastering engineer (Mister Rogers)
  • 1999 Super Deluxe Edition — Michael Howe, compilation producer; Bernie Grundman, mastering engineer (Prince)
  • Souvenir — Carolyn Agger, compilation producer; Miles Showell, mastering engineer (Orchestral Manoeuvres In The Dark)
  • Throw Down Your Heart: The Complete Africa Sessions — Béla Fleck, compilation producer; Richard Dodd, mastering engineer (Béla Fleck)

Best Engineered Album, Non-Classical

An engineer’s award. (Artists’ names appear in parentheses.)

  • Black Hole Rainbow — Shawn Everett & Ivan Wayman, engineers; Bob Ludwig,
  • mastering engineer (Devon Gilfillian)
  • Expectations — Gary Paczosa & Mike Robinson, engineers; Paul Blakemore, mastering engineer (Katie Pruitt)
  • Hyperspace — Drew Brown, Andrew Coleman, Shawn Everett, Serban Ghenea, David Greenbaum, Jaycen Joshua & Mike Larson, engineers; Randy Merrill, mastering engineer (Beck)
  • Jaime — Shawn Everett, engineer; Shawn Everett, mastering engineer (Brittany Howard)
  • 25 Trips — Shani Gandhi & Gary Paczosa, engineers; Adam Grover,
  • mastering engineer (Sierra Hull)

Producer Of The Year

A producer’s award.

  • Jack Antonoff
  • Dan Auerbach
  • Dave Cobb
  • Flying Lotus
  • Andrew Watt

Best Remixed Recording

A remixer’s award. (Artists’ names appear in parentheses for identification.) Singles or tracks only.

  • “Do You Ever (RAC Mix)” — RAC, remixer (Phil Good)
  • “Imaginary Friends (Morgan Page Remix)” — Morgan Page, remixer (Deadmau5)
  • “Praying For You (Louie Vega Main Remix)” — Louie Vega, remixer (Jasper Street Co.)
  • “Roses (Imanbek Remix)” — Imanbek Zeikenov, remixer (SAINt JHN)
  • “Young & Alive (Bazzi Vs. Haywyre Remix)” — Haywyre, remixer (Bazzi)

Best Engineered Album, Classical

An engineer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

  • Danielpour: The Passion Of Yeshua — Bernd Gottinger, engineer (JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)
  • Gershwin: Porgy And Bess — David Frost & John Kerswell, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (David Robertson, Eric Owens, Angel Blue, Metropolitan Opera Orchestra & Chorus)
  • Hynes: Fields — Kyle Pyke, engineer; Jesse Lewis & Kyle Pyke, mastering engineers (Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion)
  • Ives: Complete Symphonies — Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, engineers; Alexander Lipay & Dmitriy Lipay, mastering engineers (Gustavo Dudamel & Los Angeles Philharmonic)
  • Shostakovich: Symphony No. 13, ‘Babi Yar’ — David Frost & Charlie Post, engineers; Silas Brown, mastering engineer (Riccardo Muti & Chicago Symphony Orchestra)

Producer Of The Year, Classical

A producer’s award. (Artist names appear in parentheses.)

  • Blanton Alspaugh
  • David Frost
  • Jesse Lewis
  • Dmitriy Lipay
  • Elaine Martone

Best Orchestral Performance

Award to the conductor and to the orchestra.

  • “Aspects Of America – Pulitzer Edition” — Carlos Kalmar, conductor (Oregon Symphony)
  • “Concurrence” — Daníel Bjarnason, conductor (Iceland Symphony Orchestra)
  • “Copland: Symphony No. 3” — Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor (San Francisco Symphony)
  • “Ives: Complete Symphonies” — Gustavo Dudamel, conductor (Los Angeles Philharmonic)
  • “Lutosławski: Symphonies Nos. 2 & 3” — Hannu Lintu, conductor (Finnish Radio Symphony Orchestra)

Best Opera Recording

Award to the conductor, album producer(s) and principal soloists.

  • “Dello Joio: The Trial At Rouen” — Gil Rose, conductor; Heather Buck & Stephen Powell; Gil Rose, producer (Boston Modern Orchestra Project; Odyssey Opera Chorus)
  • “Floyd, C.: Prince Of Players” — William Boggs, conductor; Keith Phares & Kate Royal; Blanton Alspaugh, producer (Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra; Florentine Opera Chorus)
  • “Gershwin: Porgy And Bess” — David Robertson, conductor; Angel Blue & Eric Owens; David Frost, producer (The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra; The Metropolitan Opera Chorus)
  • “Handel: Agrippina” — Maxim Emelyanychev, conductor; Joyce DiDonato; Daniel Zalay, producer (Il Pomo D’Oro)
  • “Zemlinsky: Der Zwerg” — Donald Runnicles, conductor; David Butt Philip & Elena Tsallagova; Peter Ghirardini & Erwin Stürzer, producers (Orchestra Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin; Chorus Of The Deutsche Oper Berlin)

Best Choral Performance

Award to the conductor, and to the choral director and/or chorus master where applicable and to the choral organization/ensemble.

  • “Carthage” — Donald Nally, conductor (The Crossing)
  • “Danielpour: The Passion Of Yeshua” — JoAnn Falletta, conductor; James K. Bass & Adam Luebke, chorus masters (James K. Bass, J’Nai Bridges, Timothy Fallon, Kenneth Overton, Hila Plitmann & Matthew Worth; Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra; Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus & UCLA Chamber Singers)
  • “Kastalsky: Requiem” — Leonard Slatkin, conductor; Charles Bruffy, Steven Fox & Benedict Sheehan, chorus masters (Joseph Charles Beutel & Anna Dennis; Orchestra Of St. Luke’s; Cathedral Choral Society, The Clarion Choir, Kansas City Chorale & The Saint Tikhon Choir)
  • “Moravec: Sanctuary Road” — Kent Tritle, conductor (Joshua Blue, Raehann Bryce-Davis, Dashon Burton, Malcolm J. Merriweather & Laquita Mitchell; Oratorio Society Of New York Orchestra; Oratorio Society Of New York Chorus)
  • “Once Upon A Time” — Matthew Guard, conductor (Sarah Walker; Skylark Vocal Ensemble)

Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance

For new recordings of works with chamber or small ensemble (twenty-four or fewer members, not including the conductor). One award to the ensemble and one award to the conductor, if applicable.

  • “Contemporary Voices” — Pacifica Quartet
  • “Healing Modes” — Brooklyn Rider
  • “Hearne, T.: Place” — Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods & Place Orchestra
  • “Hynes: Fields” — Devonté Hynes & Third Coast Percussion
  • “The Schumann Quartets” —  Dover Quartet

Best Classical Instrumental Solo

Award to the instrumental soloist(s) and to the conductor when applicable.

  • “Adès: Concerto For Piano And Orchestra” — Kirill Gerstein; Thomas Adès, conductor (Boston Symphony Orchestra)
  • “Beethoven: Complete Piano Sonatas” — Igor Levit
  • “Bohemian Tales” — Augustin Hadelich; Jakub Hrůša, conductor (Charles Owen; Symphonieorchester Des Bayerischen Rundfunks)
  • “Destination Rachmaninov – Arrival” — Daniil Trifonov; Yannick Nézet-Séguin, conductor (The Philadelphia Orchestra)
  • “Theofanidis: Concerto For Viola And Chamber Orchestra” — Richard O’Neill; David Alan Miller, conductor (Albany Symphony)

Best Classical Solo Vocal Album

Award to: vocalist(s), collaborative artist(s) (Ex: pianists, conductors, chamber groups) producer(s), recording engineers/mixers with 51% or more playing time of new material.

  • American Composers At Play – William Bolcom, Ricky Ian Gordon, Lori Laitman, John Musto — Stephen Powell (Attacca Quartet, William Bolcom, Ricky Ian Gordon, Lori Laitman, John Musto, Charles Neidich & Jason Vieaux)
  • Clairières – Songs By Lili & Nadia Boulanger — Nicholas Phan; Myra Huang, accompanist
  • Farinelli — Cecilia Bartoli; Giovanni Antonini, conductor (Il Giardino Armonico)
  • A Lad’s Love — Brian Giebler; Steven McGhee, accompanist (Katie Hyun, Michael Katz, Jessica Meyer, Reginald Mobley & Ben Russell)
  • Smyth: The Prison — Sarah Brailey & Dashon Burton; James Blachly, conductor (Experiential Chorus; Experiential Orchestra)

Best Classical Compendium

Award to the artist(s) and to the album producer(s) and engineer(s) of over 51% playing time of the album, if other than the artist.

  • Adès Conducts Adès — Mark Stone & Christianne Stotijn; Thomas Adès, conductor; Nick Squire, producer
  • Saariaho: Graal Théâtre; Circle Map; Neiges; Vers Toi Qui Es Si Loin — Clément Mao-Takacs, conductor; Hans Kipfer, producer
  • Serebrier: Symphonic Bach Variations; Laments And Hallelujahs; Flute Concerto — José Serebrier, conductor; Jens Braun, producer
  • Thomas, M.T.: From The Diary Of Anne Frank & Meditations On Rilke — Isabel Leonard; Michael Tilson Thomas, conductor; Jack Vad, producer
  • Woolf, L.P.: Fire And Flood — Matt Haimovitz; Julian Wachner, conductor; Blanton Alspaugh, producer

Best Contemporary Classical Composition

A composer’s award. (For a contemporary classical composition composed within the last 25 years, and released for the first time during the eligibility year.) Award to the librettist, if applicable.

  • “Adès: Concerto For Piano And Orchestra” — Thomas Adès, composer (Kirill Gerstein, Thomas Adès & Boston Symphony Orchestra)
  • “Danielpour: The Passion Of Yeshua” — Richard Danielpour, composer (JoAnn Falletta, James K. Bass, Adam Luebke, UCLA Chamber Singers, Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra & Buffalo Philharmonic Chorus)
  • “Floyd, C.: Prince Of Players” — Carlisle Floyd, composer (William Boggs, Kate Royal, Keith Phares, Florentine Opera Chorus & Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra)
  • “Hearne, T.: Place” — Ted Hearne, composer (Ted Hearne, Steven Bradshaw, Sophia Byrd, Josephine Lee, Isaiah Robinson, Sol Ruiz, Ayanna Woods & Place Orchestra)
  • “Rouse: Symphony No. 5” — Christopher Rouse, composer (Giancarlo Guerrero &
  • Nashville Symphony)

Best Music Video

Award to the artist, video director, and video producer.

  • “Brown Skin Girl” — Beyoncé; Beyoncé Knowles-Carter & Jenn Nkiru, video directors; Lauren Baker, Astrid Edwards, Nathan Scherrer & Erinn Williams, video producers
  • “Life Is Good” — Future ft. Drake; Julien Christian Lutz, video director; Harv Glazer, video producer
  • “Lockdown” — Anderson .Paak; Dave Meyers, video director; Nathan Scherrer, video producer
  • “Adore You” — Harry Styles; Dave Meyers, video director; Nathan Scherrer, video producer
  • “Goliath” — Woodkid; Yoann Lemoine, video director
Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.
88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Songs that mention Milwaukee

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It’s hard to rhyme the word Milwaukee. It’s three syllables. Lots of mouth movement. Kinda clunky. And yet, to us, it’s the word we love hearing the most. I was listening to “Si Se Puede” by Antibalas and the lead singer says “Milwaukee!” and my reaction, as it always is when Milwaukee is mentioned in a song is, “OH HELL YEAH! MILWAUKEE REPRESENT!”

Over the years quite a few musicians have name dropped our city in their songs. So we made a list of songs that name drop Milwaukee. Here are some highlights.

Nelly – “Pimp Juice”

Definitely one of the most high profile Milwaukee name drops of all time. Line:

“Treat you like you’re from Milwaukee, send you Green Bay Packin”

We appreciate that Nelly understands the Packers influence across the state. This song also falls in the broader category of Milwaukee name drops in songs: sports. Other musicians are quick to put together the double meaning of a Milwaukee Buck. Migos drop “You know I got bucks but not from Milwaukee” in “Wrist Game.” Migos actually rep the city almost more than anyone, mentioning us in “Walk It Talk It (feat. Drake)” in the line “Watch it buck, no Milwaukee” and in “Came from Nothing” with the DEEP MKE Bucks bench reference to O.J. Mayo, saying “I’m getting Milwaukee Bucks, O.J.Mayo.” Bucks also get the nod from Anderson .Paak in “Chosen One“: “Who gon’ Keep it buck like Milwaukee.”

Jamila Woods feat. Chance the Rapper – “LSD”

Line: (Chance the Rapper) “I got family in Gary and STL, I got cousins in Milwaukee.”

Who are these cousins? If you are cousins with Chance, let us know. This song also falls into the larger category of Milwaukee name drops: people. The line in this song could also be a reference to the Ella Fitzgerald song “My Cousin in Milwaukee” in which an influential cousin in Milwaukee, USA, is a “positive sensation” on the stage and off. This cousin serves as an inspiration for what would become Ella’s style and grace. The song was written by Ira Gershwin, so it’s unlikely that this is a reference to a particular person although the sentiment is wonderful and we will take it. Other singers mention people they met in Milwaukee. In Jen’s Lekman’s “Forever Young, Forever Beautiful,” he starts “In Milwaukee, I met a mountaineer who told me…” and then the whole song is basically this wonderful story from this man in Milwaukee about how he has guided a woman to the top of a mountain where her husband had perished but was preserved, forever young and forever beautiful by the permanent cold of the mountain top and the relationship that they had had together.

John Prine

Although Tom Petty claims to be “the King of Milwaukee” in his song “Honey Bee,” I think we should give that title to John Prine. The singing postman, who walked the streets of Chicago also had a soft spot for Cream City. He mentions Milwaukee in three songs at least. One example is “Milwaukee Here I Come,” which was written by Lee Fikes and performed frequently by country duos Dolly Parton and Porter Wagoner AND George Jones and Tammy Wynette. However Prine recorded it and performed it frequently, I like to think, likely out of his fondness for our home. Prine also uses Milwaukee’s pointy syllables and it’s similarity to the Hawaiian alphabet to use it in a verse where it actually feels like it fits in his song “Let’s Talk Dirty in Hawaiian” saying, “Aloha Old Milwaukee, hello Waikiki” but Prine’s most famous ode to Milwaukee is in one of his all-time great songs, “Please Don’t Bury Me.” In the song he dies and instead of being buried in the cold cold ground, he wants to give his body away, bequeathing Milwaukee his stomach, in case we run out of beer. It’s not a line that should have me crying, but Prine died this year, and here I am.

This song falls into the larger category of Milwaukee name drops: beer. If there is one thing Milwaukee is famous for world wide, it’s brew. Most famously remembered in Jerry Lee Lewis’s song “What’s Made Milwaukee Famous (Has Made a Loser Out of Me.)” It’s a song that has been covered far and wide by the likes of Rod Stewart, Eric Church and others. But my favorite song about beer and Milwaukee is David Allan Coe’s “Juanita.”

Apparently, the story is that David Allan Coe had a spot that he liked to hang out in the Florida Keys. At this spot he would drink and play music and, occasionally, invite some friends over. David Allan Coe was in the outlaw country crowd, and, weirdly, children’s poet Shel Silverstein was part of this crowd. He wrote “A Boy Named Sue” for Johnny Cash and “The Taker” for Waylon Jennings, among others, and on the beach in the Florida Keys Shel Silverstein played this song for Coe as a joke but Coe loved it so much that he put it on his album, “Tennessee Whiskey” and later on his “Greatest Hits.” It’s a song about a man who is on the lam and is trying to convince his sweetheart, Juanita, that they should move from Mexico to Milwaukee. To persuade her he tells here that Lake Michigan tastes like tequila frijoles. And all of Milwaukee speaks Spanish. He really sells it.

Finally, one of my favorite Milwaukee references in song was inspired by true events. In GG Allin’s “Shove that warrant Up Your Ass,” he yells that “Milwaukee, Wisconsin” can, well, you guessed it, “shove that warrant up your ass.” The song is surprisingly melodic, landing somewhere in between The Ramones and Misfits. When the Murder Junkies come in for the backing vocals, you want to raise your fists right with them and complete the call and response by yelling “shove that warrant up your ass!”

The incident in question: Allin’s 1989 show at Odd Rock Café where he took a shit on stage and then threw that shit at the audience. This was a pretty standard stage move for Allin at the time, nonetheless, it must have been pretty shocking for the audience and the owner, Jack Koshik, who came in and stopped the show. Later Allin was charged with disorderly conduct and public indecency and was sentenced to 90 days in prison, a $1,000 fine, and a warrant for his arrest.

There are many MANY other songs that mention Milwaukee, including some of the best by Bon Iver, Freddie Gibbs and tons of others. I made a playlist here with a lot of them. It is by no means exhaustive and I’m sorry if I missed your favorite, but hopefully you can listen along and when Milwaukee is referenced, put your fist up and yell, “OH HELL YEAH! MILWAUKEE REPRESENT!”

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Class is in session at 88Nine’s ‘School of Rock’

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Artists featured: Pixies, Celia Cruz, Bob Marley, ABBA, and Cyndi Lauper.
Artwork by Erin Bagatta

Get your kids up, put away the tablets and sit them down in front of the radio. Dori Zori will teach them about the musicians that have shaped our world — from Bowie to Bjork, Prince to Presley — and, of course, fill the hour with lots of their music.

Listen live on the air weekdays from 9 to 10 a.m. for Dori’s lesson, focused on a different artist every day. We’ll post it here, too, in case you missed it, along with each day’s lesson plan, written by certified teacher and Milwaukee artist, B~Free and other 88Nine staff.

Every day, our mission drives us to share more great music and stories. But it’s our members who fuel that mission. If you aren’t one yet, what are you waiting for? Become a member today!

Here’s what’s coming up on School of Rock

May 25 – 29

Monday: Memorial Day, No Lesson

Tuesday: Nile Rogers

Wednesday: Missy Elliott

Thursday: Stevie Wonder

Friday: Duran Duran

May 18 – 22

Monday: Celia Cruz

Tuesday: Pixies

Wednesday: ABBA

Thursday: Bob Marley

Friday: Cyndi Lauper

Paul Cebar

Today on School of Rock we are featuring the life and work of Milwaukee treasure Paul Cebar. Paul is a songwriter, singer and guitarist from our beloved hometown. His musical journey began at age 12, when he saw Wild Magnolias at Milwaukee’s Lakefront Festival of the Arts. He fell in love with their style and sounds… and the rest is history.

Paul Cebar picked up a guitar for the first time when he was a senior at Pius XI High School in Milwaukee. Paul found the thrill of live music in the thriving coffeehouse scene of Milwaukee in the ’70s, at venues The Coffeehouse, The Blue Rive Café, The Eighth Note and Kenwood Inn at UWM, and went on to play with some of the city’s most influential bands, including The R&B Cadets, Paul Cebar and the Milwaukeeans and Tomorrow Sound.

John Prine

Today we celebrate the music and life of the beloved John Prine, who we lost less than a week ago to COVID-19 at age 73. One of the most celebrated singer/songwriters of his generation, John Prine was a master storyteller whose work was often witty and always heartfelt, and somehow balanced elements of the mundane, political protest and social commentary. While Prine’s songs were often rooted in folk and country, he was no stranger to rock ‘n’ roll, R&B and rockabilly, and he readily adapted his rough but expressive voice to his musical surroundings. 

John Prine was a keen observer of the human condition. He translated his observations and his own experiences into songs about everyday life, loneliness, the elderly, victims of war and those abandoned by the American dream, and did so with a blend of poignancy, anger and sudden bursts of humor. 

Mavis Staples

We’re closing out this week’s School of Rock series with an American rhythm and blues and gospel singer, actress, and civil rights activist.

She has recorded and performed with her family’s band and as a solo artist. We are talking about the wonderfully talented, Mavis Staples!

Mavis Staples has been honored by The Rock & Roll, Blues and Gospel Music Hall of Fame. To this day, there is no mistaking Mavis’ voice, and she is considered by many as a national treasure. Whether it’s a 1950s song with her family band, The Staple Singers, or a solo cut recorded over half-a-century later, Mavis’ voice is instantly identifiable, likely to lift your spirit and inspire anyone within earshot.

Dolly Parton

Today on School of Rock we will take a brief look into the life of Country music icon, actress and beloved celebrity, Dolly Parton. Dolly was born in January, 1946 as the fourth child of twelve. Dolly grew up in a small community in the Great Smoky Mountains of East Tennessee and her family didn’t have much besides the one-room cabin they lived in, which didn’t even have running water. Dolly’s grandfather was a preacher so the family attended church regularly and it’s where she first learned about music. She had her first performance in church at age six.

Dolly’s greatness doesn’t end with her music. She is the subject of WNYC’s “Dolly Parton’s America” podcast, inspiration for “Dolly Parton’s Heartstrings” Netflix series and has become a social media icon. On the podcast, Dolly alludes to writing her iconic hits “Jolene” and “I Will Always Love You” on the same night. Now that is talent.

Q-Tip

For this lesson, we’re are talking about The Abstract, or better known by his stage name… Q-Tip! Jonathan William Davis was born on April 10, 1970 in Harlem, New York City. After moving Queens, he met his future A Tribe Called Quest collaborator Phife Dawg at church when they were both just two years old. At age nine, the two friends both heard. “Rapper’s Delight” by The Sugarhill Gang for the first time and after some encouragement by Phife, Jonathan soon started rapping. He was also inspired by his father’s extensive jazz record collection, and at age 12, he began to DJ and even made his own beats.

Q-Tip’s innovative and experimental production, which led a jazz-based hip-hop revolution during the ’90s, is part of music history. Many of today’s current producers and musicians credit Q-Tip’s influence on their own work. His flow is often cited as “mellow” and “smooth” with flexible rhyme schemes and a voice that he treats “like an instrument” within the music.

Fishbone

Fishbone has been described as one of the most distinctive and eclectic alternative rock bands of the ’80s, playing a fusion of ska, punk, funk, metal, reggae and soul. What a combo! You may not be super familiar with this band, as they never really had a mainstream audience. Fishbone did and does have a large cult following though, and we’re going to find out why.

The band started in 1979 while the Fisher brothers were in junior high. With their friends Angelo, Christopher, Kendall and Walter they made up Fishbone. Instruments consisted of bass guitar, guitar, drums, trumpet, trombone, saxophone, keyboard and theremin. For those of you unfamiliar with the theremin, it is an electronic instrument with antennas that one plays without ever coming in physical contact with. Cool, huh?

Here’s what’s coming up on School of Rock

April 20: Beatles

April 21: Ray Charles

April 22: Sheryl Crow

April 23: Johnny Cash

April 24: Ella Fitzgerald

Harry Belafonte

Harry Belafonte started his career in music as a club singer in New York to pay for his acting classes. As a matter of fact, the first time he appeared in front of an audience, he was backed by the Charlie Parker band, which included famous jazz musicians Charlie Parker himself, Max Roach and Miles Davis, among others. At first, he was a pop singer, launching his recording career on the Roost label in 1949, but later he developed a keen interest in folk music, learning material through the Library of Congress’ American folk songs archives. With guitarist and friend Millard Thomas, Belafonte soon made his debut at the legendary jazz club, “The Village Vanguard.” In 1953, he signed a contract with RCA Records, where he stayed for nearly 20 years.

Today, Harry continues to serve his community and world through continual activism efforts, while never passing up a moment to perform and celebrate the joy that his music brings.

Queen Latifah

Today, Dana Owens, a.k.a. Queen Latifah is a multifaceted entertainer who is one of the strongest pioneers for women in hip-hop music.

From her early start in rapping, to becoming a versatile businesswoman, she’s managed to achieve much success while opening doors  in the entertainment industry for other women to walk through.

In the latter part of her career, she has produced films, hosted her very own daytime talk show and become one of the most versatile and inclusive models for CoverGirl Cosmetics. For her work, Queen Latifah was also honored with her own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 2006.

Hall & Oates

In 1984, Hall & Oates was named the most successful duo in rock history by the Recording Industry Association of America. Billboard Magazine also named them the most successful duo of the rock era.

In total, Hall & Oates had 34 chart hits on the US Billboard Hot 100 list. They have been inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. In 2016, the duo received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the partnership between Daryl Hall and John Oates and they are plotting a new album.

Beastie Boys

The Beastie Boys altered the direction of popular music at least three times, and lived to tell the tale. From their 1986 debut album to their final release in 2011, the boys and their music prominently dwelled in the world of alt-rock, while introducing the hip-hop genre to the suburban masses. Music critics of today still cite many of their projects as pinnacle examples of hip-hop’s golden era of sampling.

In 2012, the group suffered a terrible loss when Adam “MCA” Yauch unfortunately passed due to cancer. Many members of the musical community expressed their sincerest gratitude for Adam and their work of the group as a whole. They became the third rap group to be inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in that same year.

To date, The Beastie Boys have sold 20 million records in the United States, making them the biggest-selling rap group since Billboard began recording sales in 1991. With seven platinum-selling albums from 1986 to 2004, the Beastie Boys were one of the longest-lived hip hop acts worldwide.

Bjork

Today in School of Rock, we are traveling to Iceland to learn about Bjork! She truly defies any musical genre with her eclectic and experimental music.

Bjork is Iceland’s first big international pop icon and she went on to wow people from all over the world, recognized by  VH1’s “100 Greatest Women in Music,” MTV’s “22 Greatest Voices in Music” and Rolling Stone’s “100 Greatest Singers of All Time”.

Among her musical accomplishments, Bjork has become an environmental activist and founded Nattura, a nonprofit which promotes nature and grassroots industries in Iceland. She also started a fund called BJORK, supporting the creation of sustainable businesses.

David Bowie

Today’s session starts with a trip across the Atlantic Ocean to learn about a British singer-songwriter and actor, considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th Century. We are talking about the man, the rock star, Mr. David Bowie!

During his lifetime, his record sales — estimated at over 100 million records worldwide — made him one of the world’s best-selling music artists. In the UK, he was awarded 10 platinum album certifications, 11 gold and eight silver and released 11 number-one albums. In the U.S., he received five platinum and nine gold certifications. He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1996.

Diana Ross

Our lesson for today will focus on an American singer, actress, and record producer. She went from leading one of the top-selling girl groups in music to sustaining her own very extensive solo career, and she has released music in many genre, including R&B, soul, disco and jazz. We are talking about the famed diva, Ms. Diana Ross!

Diana Ross has withstood the test of time as a performer with a career that continues to span more than four decades. Her full discography consists of a total of 24 studio albums and 115 singles, with six of those reaching number one on the charts. It should also be noted that her success reached international levels, as well. She has had a top-10 UK hit in each of the last five decades. She has sold over 100 million albums worldwide and has won several major awards, including a Golden Globe, a Tony and several American Music Awards. Ross was also inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1988 as part of The Supremes, received a Grammy Award for Lifetime Achievement and has received the Presidential Medal of Freedom from Barack Obama.

Today, she continues to tour and perform all over the world, all while maintaining her Diva status as one of the top-selling women in music of all time. Ross just celebrated her 76th birthday yesterday, which is a phenomenal thing so a very happy birthday goes out to her, indeed!

Elvis Presley

Elvis Aaron Presley was born on Jan. 8, 1935, in Tupelo, Miss., to Vernon Elvis and Gladys Love. When Elvis entered first grade at East Tupelo Consolidated, his teachers regarded him as “average.” A few years later, a schoolteacher was impressed with his rendition of Red Foley’s country song “Old Shep” during morning prayers and encouraged Elvis to enter a singing contest. The contest, held at the Mississippi – Alabama Fair and Dairy Show in 1945, was his first public performance.

Elvis never received formal music training and could not read music so he studied and played by ear. He frequented record stores, listened to the regional radio stations and was a regular audience member at the monthly All-Night Singings downtown. By the time he graduated from high school in 1953, he had already singled out music as his future.

Aretha Franklin

Aretha Louise Franklin was born on March 25, 1942, in Memphis. She was the fourth of five children to the famed Baptist preacher Reverend C. L. Franklin and her mother, Barbara Siggers Franklin, who was a gospel singer and pianist herself. Growing up in this environment exposed Aretha to a great deal of music, and her talents became apparent at an early age. She was largely self-taught and regarded as a “child prodigy” when others discovered that she was a wonderful pianist with a very powerful voice. 

In the span of her music career, Aretha sold more than 75 million albums worldwide. With 18 Grammys under her belt, Franklin remains one of the most honored artists in Grammy history, ranked among the likes of Alison Krauss, Adele and Beyoncé Knowles. Among her final recordings are notable covers such as Adele’s “Rolling in the Deep,” which was featured on her album “Aretha Franklin Sings the Great Diva Classics,” released in October 2014. Tragically, we lost Aretha in 2018 but her contributions to American music will continue to establish her as the one and only “Queen of Soul.”

Kenny Rogers

Kenny Rogers was one of the most popular country singers of all time. Sadly, he passed away on March 20, 2020 at the age of 81. So it seems like the right time to honor him – by getting to know more about him and his music.

Kenny Rogers kept making music and touring – and remained popular around the world – until he retired a couple of years ago. In all, he won three Grammys and just about every award given to a country artist, including induction into the Country Music Hall of Fame.

His final concert took place in Nashville. It featured an all-star lineup of singers from country and pop music – including a special appearance by long-time friend Dolly Parton, who performed “Islands in the Stream” with Rogers for the final time.

Prince

To kick off our School of Rock session, we’ll be discussing considerably one of the most gifted individuals to ever grace this earth. A man of many talents that ranged from singing, writing, playing instruments, producing and starring in movies; we are talking about none other than “The Purple One” known as Prince.

In this lesson, we talk about the life and artistic journey of a generally self-made, self-taught musician from the Midwest, who took chances on himself, his work and his career all for the belief of making good music. It’s important to note that his creativity also spread to others as he wrote for and collaborated with a number of artists from Chaka Khan and Stevie Nicks, to Madonna and Janelle Monae. 

Unfortunately, we suffered from a terrible loss in April of 2016 with his sudden passing, but the impact of his life is still felt and celebrated by many. Some would say that the story of his career promotes the idea of courage, creativity, truth and individuality. These have all been important examples for anyone looking to establish themselves and their identity; in life, music and much more. More than anything, we are thankful for his presence and for his musical contributions to the world.

School of Rock is a new program developed to keep you connected! If tuning in has helped you find some joy and community, we hope you’ll consider supporting Radio Milwaukee.

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

JOSEPH HUBER ‘MOONDOG’ ALBUM RELEASE W/ SP. GUESTS DRIVEWAY THRIFTDWELLERS- THURSDAY, AUGUST 1ST 8PM

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JOSEPH HUBER ‘MOONDOG’ ALBUM RELEASE W/ SP. GUESTS DRIVEWAY THRIFTDWELLERS- THURSDAY, AUGUST 1ST 8PM
More Info

$8 advance tickets on sale HERE or $12 at the door. Doors 7pm/ show 8pm.

Joseph Huber hails from the state of Wisconsin, and seems to bring forth the varied voices of whatever it may be that lies dormant within either the fertile soil or the callous concrete of that world. It has been said, “You don’t just like Joseph Huber’s music. You feel it’s something that the rest of the world needs to hear, and how criminal it is that it isn’t spreading far and wide.” That sentiment could be related to the fact that the voices which Huber unearths are subtle and take more than a hurried listen to truly absorb. A person who appears reserved and matter-of-fact in everyday speech brings forth songs that are anything but that.
His lyricism and introspective writing style has received high acclaim from music enthusiasts looking for a more substantive substitute to much of today’s music. Maintaining a solid touring schedule, playing all throughout both the U.S. and all around Europe, Huber continues to gain positive press, including being listed on L.A. Weekly’s ’10 More Country Artists To Listen To.’ Blue Ridge Outdoor writes, “Songwriters like Townes Van Zandt, Chris Smither, and John Prine can marvel listeners in the simplest of acoustic settings,…From time to time, I stumble upon a new singer/songwriter whose work warrants comparison to the luminaries on this list. …Huber’s songwriting has me comparing him to my favorites above.”
As of now, Huber has delivered four solo records: ‘Bury Me Where I Fall’ (2010); ‘Tongues Of Fire’ (2012), ‘The Hanging Road’ (2014); and ‘The Suffering Stage’ (2017). Now, 2019 gives us ‘Moondog’–a record of variety and transition that seems to scream, “What else!” The only constant throughout is the lyrical precision, while musically it moseys and roves wherever it will with the promise that Huber always has more on his mind and more up his sleeve.

See this show! Only $8! Purchase HERE or $12 at door.

josephhuber-anodyne.eventbrite.com

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Five things to do this weekend in Milwaukee

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#1

Ghost Light

“I think of this album like a bunch of abstract paintings,” says Ghost Light’s Tom Hamilton. “We present the songs as a series meant to be experienced in a certain order, but at the end of the day, whatever that series makes you feel is totally up to you.”

Gritty and refined, sprawling and restrained, straightforward and psychedelic are just a few of the terms that describe Ghost Light. I’d add “trippy” to that, as members of the band used LSD regularly while working into the wee hours of the morning in studio refining a sound that really is more like film or painting. You could call it jazz I suppose, but in the endlessly improvisational sense of the word. Their journeys can be dictated by the emotional temperature of the room on any given night. That said, it could be hella interesting to see what happens when they make vibrations with Milwaukee at the Back Room tonight. It’s definitely one to see on a whim.

Thursday at 7 p.m. @ The Back Room

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Five things to do this weekend in Milwaukee

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#1

Old World Third Street “Cupid’s Shuffle”

Let’s face it, Valentine’s Day sucks. It’s not even a real holiday, it’s just another way to sucker you into spending money. And if you’re single, it’s really just around to make you feel unlucky, insufficient or unloved. Even if you’re in a LTR, it’s probably just more pressure for you to conform to a cultural ideal you were never even consulted on. For a day all about being “romantic,” it’s too easy to find yourself in a situation that is the exact opposite.

You’re probably agreeing with me right now but you’re also probably still like, gonna do something today—either in spite of it or for it. The “come as you are” event for the day is on Old World Third Street tonight in Downtown Milwaukee as the area bars have joined forces for the Cupid Shuffle, offering color coded wristbands (red if you’re taken, green if you’re single and ready to mingle and yellow if you’re just getting drunk) with color coded drink specials. Bars will also have DJs and who knows, you could get lucky…

Saturday at 8 p.m. @ 1100 block of Old World 3rd Street

88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Radio Milwaukee’s top 100 albums of 2018

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The top 100 albums of 2018

  1. Janelle Monáe – “Dirty Computer”
  2. Courtney Barnett – “Tell Me How You Really Feel”
  3. Father John Misty – “God’s Favorite Customer”
  4. Mitski – “Be the Cowboy”
  5. Brandi Carlile – “By The Way, I Forgive You”
  6. Florence + the Machine – “High As Hope”
  7. Ariana Grande – “Sweetener”
  8. Chvrches – “Love Is Dead”
  9. Beach House – 7
  10. Boygenius – Boygenius
  11. Leon Bridges – Good Thing
  12. Arctic Monkeys – Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino
  13. Car Seat Headrest – Twin Fantasy
  14. Anderson .Paak – Oxnard
  15. BORNS – Blue Madonna
  16. Death Cab For Cutie – Thank You For Today
  17. Field Report – Summertime Songs
  18. Big Red Machine – Big Red Machine
  19. Lex Allen – Table 7: Sinners & Saints
  20. The Decemberists – I’ll Be Your Girl
  21. Snail Mail – Lush
  22. Maggie Rogers – Heard It In A Past Life
  23. Hippo Campus – Bambi
  24. Mac Miller – Swimming
  25. Soccer Mommy – Clean
  26. The 1975 – A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships
  27. Kacey Musgraves – Golden Hour
  28. Dog – Critical Equation
  29. Noname – Room 25
  30. Cardi B – Invasion of Privacy
  31. Pusha T – Daytona
  32. Robyn – Honey
  33. Brockhampton – iridescence
  34. Neko Case – Hell-On
  35. Mumford & Sons – Delta
  36. David Byrne – American Utopia
  37. Blood Orange – Negro Swan
  38. Jeff Tweedy – WARM
  39. Gorillaz – The Now Now
  40. Parquet Courts – Wide Awake!
  41. Superorganism – Superorganism
  42. Travis Scott – Astroworld
  43. Lucy Dacus – Historian
  44. Kali Uchis – Isolation
  45. Interpol – Marauder
  46. Dead Horses – My Mother the Moon
  47. Caroline Rose – Loner
  48. Christine and the Queens – Chris
  49. A$AP Rocky – Testing
  50. Brett Newski – Life Upside Down
  51. Various Artists – Black Panther: The Album
  52. Cold War Kids – LA DIVINE
  53. Jungle – For Ever
  54. MGMT – Little Dark Age
  55. John Prine – The Tree of Forgiveness
  56. Atmosphere – Mi Vida Local
  57. Paper Holland – Galapagos
  58. Amen Dunes – Freedom
  59. Kamasi Washington – Heaven and Earth
  60. The Weeknd – My Dear Melancholy,
  61. Drake – Scorpion
  62. Cat Power – Wanderer
  63. Nathaniel Rateliff & The Night Sweats – Tearing at the Seams
  64. Albert Hammond Jr. – Francis Trouble
  65. Amanda Huff – Hemiptera
  66. Phosphorescent – C’est La Vie
  67. John Coltrane – Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album
  68. Dawes – Passwords
  69. Lucius – Nudes
  70. Jorja Smith – Lost & Found
  71. Wye Oak – The Louder I Call, The Faster It Runs
  72. Santigold – I Don’t Want: The Gold Fire Sessions
  73. Charles Bradley – Black Velvet
  74. The Record Company – All of This Life
  75. Franz Ferdinand – Always Ascending
  76. Esperanza Spalding – 12 Little Spells
  77. Calexico – The Thread That Keeps Us
  78. Khruangbin – Con Todo El Mundo
  79. Lorde Fred33 – NORF: The Legend of Hotboy Ronald
  80. Jack White – Boarding House Reach
  81. Jim James – Uniform Distortion
  82. Khalid – Suncity
  83. Bahamas – Earthtones
  84. King Tuff – The Other
  85. Ray LaMontagne – Part Of The Light
  86. serpentwithfeet – soil
  87. Teyana Taylor – K.T.S.E.
  88. J Balvin – Vibras
  89. Rhett Miller – The Messenger
  90. U2 – Songs of Experience
  91. Glen Hansard – Between Two Shores
  92. Unknown Mortal Orchestra – Sex & Food
  93. Bob Mould – Sunshine Rock
  94. The Internet – Hive Mind
  95. E.R. – I Used to Know Her: Part 2 – EP
  96. Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers – An American Treasure
  97. Toro Y Moi – Oute Peace
  98. Paul McCartney – Egypt Station
  99. Elvis Costello & The Imposters – Look Now
  100. Vince Staples – FM!
88Nine Radio Milwaukee

Kurt Vile and The Violators at Turner Hall Ballroom

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88Nine Radio Milwaukee