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State of Sound is back & even bigger. Get tix for the next show!

The concerts and albums we’re most excited about (so far) for 2024

Graphic by Jen Ellis

In the world of music enjoyment, the month of December is split into two distinct parts: looking back and looking forward. We did the first one in a big way as we shared your favorite songs, our essential albums, the 123 best songs and most moving songs of 2023. Now, it’s time to flip the calendar.

Unfortunately, we can’t cover all of 2024. There are so many announcements yet to be made, both on the concert and album fronts. But there’s plenty to get excited about just in the first few months of the year alone, as well as some bread crumbs from our favorite bands that seem to indicate the imminent release of new music.

You can find some of our picks below, and we encourage you to keep coming back to the website and to follow our various social media channels as we bring you all the concert announcements, brand new singles and fresh albums as they roll out in 2024.


Most anticipated concerts of 2024

Feb. 3: Graham Hunt album-release show @ Cactus Club

Graham Hunt’s single “Tashmere Anthill” might be my favorite song he’s released yet. That says a lot because, between his bands and his own stuff, he’s released an awful lot.

The former Midnight Reruns leader has put out a steady wave of great solo music over the past few years, even collab-ing with notable artists like Bully, and his latest finds him dabbling in experimental production and vibes (a la ’90s Beck) that promise big things for his newest full-length, Try Not To Laugh.

Experience the new songs from Hunt at his album-release show Feb. 3 at Cactus Club, and you’ll also get served up a new EP from Milwaukee x NYC indie rock rapper Rustbelt (formerly known as Juiceboxxx), as well as a helping of Milwaukee dream-rocker Shontrail.

— Erin Wolf, 88Nine Music Director


March 22: Mitski, Julia Jacklin @ The Auditorium Theatre in Chicago

The last time Mitski played a show in Milwaukee, I didn’t go. That was in March 2022, when events with crowds felt like they were finally getting back to normal, and the show was moved from the Riverside Theater to the Miller High Life Theater because the demand for Mitski was so high. I knew a bunch of people who went to that performance and said it was magnificent.

So, when Mitski announced a new tour supporting her latest album, The Land Is Inhospitable and So Are We, I didn’t want to miss out again. The tickets went on sale for her run of four shows at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre, and I scrambled through Ticketmaster’s waiting portal to snatch a pair of tickets for March 22 before it sold out, which it did within minutes — as did all 36 shows on her worldwide tour.

Sorry if you weren’t lucky like I was. But considering the venue sizes have grown drastically for each of her successive tours, maybe there will be more tickets available next go-around when she’s inevitably playing full-sized arenas. See you at Fiserv Forum in 2026.

— Dan Reiner, Social Media Manager


April 20: Slaughter Beach, Dog @ Vivarium

Next year’s concert calendar isn’t remotely close to being filled out. Yet it’s already clear that 2024, as they say, isn’t f$&@ing around. Alvvays, The Postal Service / Death Cab for Cutie and Brigitte Calls Me Baby all caught my eye, but the big show for me (so far anyway) is slated for the city’s newest venue: Slaughter Beach, Dog at the Vivarium on April 20.

As someone who trafficks in words, I’ll always gravitate toward outstanding lyricists, and SBD’s Jake Ewald certainly qualifies. The former frontman of the much-loved Modern Baseball rattles off lines that stir up emotions — this despite a vocal approach that can generously be described as “relaxed.” Ewald has also built a nice collection of musicians since starting this as a solo project, and it shows with every new album as their sound takes another step forward.

Having never seen SBD live adds a few more points to the tally, making this the show I’m looking forward to most in 2024 — at least until Vampire Weekend announces their tour.

— Brett Krzykowski, Web Editor


Most anticipated albums of 2024

Kali Uchis, Orquídeas (Jan. 12)

I’m buzzing with excitement for Kali Uchis’ musical journey and her upcoming project, Orquídeas, set to drop Jan. 12. Just like the orchid symbolizes diverse beauty, this project is poised to reflect the intricate layers and rich dimensions of her music.

Her trio of singles this year — flaunting collaborations with talents like El Alfa, JT from City Girls, and Karol G — hints at a vibrant blend of styles, akin to the graceful diversity of an orchid. Moreover, the album boasts additional appearances from the likes of regional Mexican sensation Peso Pluma and electrifying Puerto Rican pop Latin star Rauw Alejandro, promising an even more dynamic and enriching musical experience.

— Kenny Perez, 88Nine Asst. Program Director / On-Air Host


Coco, 2 (March 1)

I’ve long been a fan of Dirty Projectors. So I was stoked when the musical world of NYC’s Coco was introduced to me as an offshoot project from Maia Friedman (of Dirty Projectors), Dan Molad (of Lucius, Chimney) and Oliver Hill (of Pavo Pavo, Dustrider).

88Nine is currently playing Coco’s newest single, “Mythological Man,” which hits that sweet spot of scrungey indie folk rock — complete with sax, orchestral embellishments and great vocals popped up high in the mix. It’s my holdover for a new Aldous Harding record, and if the new single is a promise of more of the same on the full album, I’m here for it.

— Erin Wolf, 88Nine Music Director


Vampire Weekend, LP5 (???)

I’m in a bind here, since the album I’m most looking forward to in 2024 hasn’t technically been announced yet. But I’ll be optimistic and go with Vampire Weekend’s LP5 anyway.

My sunny disposition regarding the album’s chances of coming out in 2024 stems from bassist Chris Baio’s all-caps declaration that it is, in fact, “DONE” (a sentiment confirmed to Pitchfork by “a representative of Vampire Weekend”). Little is known besides something about frontman Ezra Koenig taking raga-singing lessons in rural Japan — a statement that would raise eyebrows and suspicions for most but just makes me more curiously excited considering the band’s consistent excellence to this point.

Each VM album has been better than the last, with Father of the Bride continuing the run despite concerns over soundsmith Rostam Batmanglij departing the group. Will they officially pass the five-album test? I can’t wait to find out.

— Brett Krzykowski, Web Editor


Hiatus Kaiyote, LP4 (???)

There’s a layer of unpredictability that comes with the territory of being a fan of Hiatus Kaiyote. I would cite the group’s 2013 debut LP, Tawk Tomahawk, as being the foundation for my taste in music. The 2015 follow-up, Choose Your Weapon, only solidified that feeling. Then, the band took a long … let’s say hiatus — from touring and from making music.

There was a time in my post-grad life that I feared I would only have those two records for the rest of my life. They played only a handful of sporadic live shows between 2017 and early 2021, many of them in their native Australia. But then! The 2021 release of their third LP, Mood Valiant, scratched an itch that had been there for years. It has the classic Hiatus eclecticism — the funk, the jazz, the weird ambient noises — but felt a little more evolved and a bit darker, which I liked.

Hiatus took Mood Valiant and really showed it off. Since it was released, I’ve seen the full band twice and lead singer Nai Palm in concert once solo. It’s a live show I can’t recommend enough (and it’s a big reason why Hiatus was my top Spotify artist this year). And throughout their globetrotting, the band hasn’t been secretive about working on their next project.

“Nai Palm taking a break from recording Hiatus Kaiyote’s 4th album…” reads a July 8 Instagram post. Subsequent Instagram stories have let followers know that recording and mixing are complete. So, we know album No. 4 is coming. But as for that layer of unpredictability, the question now is: When will it be released?

— Dan Reiner, Social Media Manager